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394 Lafferty,Bridget (Bridie). (1923–86).Piano,born Dublin; her father was from Derry and her mother from Donegal – both had a keen interest in traditional music. She lived all her life in Dublin, where she was a popular and accomplished piano accompanist to traditional musicians f rom all parts of Ireland. Over the years she played with leading musicians including Paddy Canny, Peter O’Loughlin and P. Joe Hayes, and in the Kincora, the Brophy, the Castle, the Green Linnet and the Fodhla Céilí Bands. She ran a boarding house at Home Farm Road, Drumcondra, where she was landlady to many of her musician friends. Her house was sometimes used by Ciarán Mac Mathúna for making recordings for his radio programmes. [MIT] Laichtín Naofa Céilí Band. (1954–62). From Miltown Malbay in Co. Clare, this had a gallery of legendary stylists – Paddy Galvin, Junior Crehan, James Flynn and Christy Dixon (fiddles), Paddy Joe McMahon and Michael Sexton (accordions), Willie Clancy and Martin Talty (uilleann pipes), J.C. Talty, Josie Hayes and Michael Falsey (flute), Jimmy Ward (banjo), Angela Merry (double bass), Colm O’Connor (piano), Paddy Malone, Martin Malone and Aiden Vaughan (drums). In 1958 they became Munster Fleadh champions and were second to the Kincora Céilí Band at the All-Ireland Fleadh in Longford.The band also won first place in the Oireachtas in Dublin in 1959.That year they recorded an lp Come to an Irish Dance Party which was released on the Dublin Record Company label. In 2008 it was re-released in cd format by CCÉ’s Cois na hAbhna Archive in Ennis. [GEC] LáLugh. An experimental Dundalk duet ofsinger, flute player and songwriter Eithne Ní Uallacháin (1957–1999) and fiddler Gerry O’Connor. Based in the song and music legacy of their locale of south Ulster, their selection of material and suspended performance and song/music arrangements bring a poetic,chamber music sensibility to old airs and fresh lyrics.They recorded three albums as Lá Lugh (1991), as Brighid’s Kiss (1996) and Senex Puer (1998). See O’Connor, Gerry; Ní Uallacháin, Eithne. Lambeg drum. Developed from an eighteenthcentury ‘long drum’, it had reached its present size by the late 1800s (3' diameter, 2'4" wide, 30lb weight, volume +/– 120 decibels). It is played in accompaniment to fife and sometimes played in combination with snare drums.It is associated with processions of Orange Order and Ancient Order of Hibernians.It is made of oak and goatskin,rope Lambeg drum maker Richard Sterrit of Markethill ‘rattling the tibby’ for his father Lá Lugh, 1992 [Jim McGinn] L lancers 395 tensioned, with painted decorations on shell and hoops. Originally played at low tension with ballheaded sticks, canes were introduced around the 1870s and rhythms speeded up; tension, volume and size all increased, motivated by competitions where drum was matched against drum, and greater volume was needed to rise above opponents. Importance of competitions meant its role as an accompaniment to fife in processions was marginalised .Drumming associations now arrange matches throughout the year. Styles changed accordingly from ‘single time’ (slow single beats in a set tune), to ‘double time’,with rolls added,then to fast,loud, repetitive rolling, ‘competition time’. Lambegs are found in counties Antrim, Down, Armagh and Tyrone. With old styles of playing, and AOH tradition largely moribund, it is now played with fifes only in the mid-Antrim area.Largely superseded by flute bands since the end of the 1800s,it is now perceived as being old fashioned and rustic although it regained a political iconicism in the late 1990s. An instrument unique to Ireland,it is possibly the only European traditional drum music and is most likely the oldest Irish music of that kind. [GAH] lament. See slow air. lancers. 1. Military personnel on horseback who fought with lances. They were still functional by the First World War, but were rendered redundant                                                                                                       Fine                                             D.C.                                                                     Lancers quadrille music Laois 396 by motor transport and the rifle.Many cavalry regiments today continue to use the name lancers. 2. ‘The lancers’, the so-called ‘second set of quadrilles ’ is known as ‘the Lancer quadrilles’ (1817), created by Dublin dancing master and dance school proprietor Duval, and said by historian Curt Sachs to have been composed for a lancers regiment based in Dublin. One nineteenth-century book illustrates the currency of sets: ‘The Lancers’ quadrilles, or ‘Duval of Dublin’s second set’ (London: Willis...