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Source Acknowledgments The following stories appear here by permission of the copyright holders. Belle Deacon, ‘‘Deg Hit’an Gixudhoy (The People’s Stories),’’ ‘‘Taxghozr (Polar Bear),’’ and ‘‘Nił’oqay Ni’idaxin (The Man and Wife),’’ were published in Engithidong Xugixudhoy (Their Stories of Long Ago) (Fairbanks: Alaska Native Language Center and Iditarod Area School District, ). Catherine Attla, ‘‘Doz K’ikaal Yee Nogheełt’uyhdlee (The One Who Used to Put His Nephew into a Fishtail)’’ and ‘‘Dotson’ Sa Ninin’’atłtseen (Great Raven Who Shaped the World),’’ were published in Sitsiy Yugh Noholnik Ts’in’ (As My Grandfather Told It): Traditional Stories from the Koyukuk, transcribed by Eliza Jones, translatedbyElizaJonesandMelissa Axelrod(Fairbanks:YukonKoyukukSchoolDistrict and Alaska Native Language Center, ). Catherine Attla, ‘‘K’etl’enbaalots’ek,’’ ‘‘Dekeltlaal De’ot Etldleeyee (The Woodpecker Who Starved His Wife),’’ and‘‘Ełts’eeyh Denaa (Wind Man)’’ were published in Bekk’aatugh Ts’uhuney (Stories We Live By): Traditional Koyukon Athabaskan Stories, revised edition, transcribed by Eliza Jones, translated by Eliza Jones and Chad Thompson (Fairbanks: Yukon Koyukuk School District and Alaska Native Language Center, ). Katherine Peter, selection from ‘‘Gwichyaa Zheh Gwats’à’ Tr’ahàajil (We Go to Fort Yukon),’’ and chapter  ‘‘Jalgiitsik, Tł’yahdik Hàa (Chalkyitsik and Tł’yahdik),’’ were published in Neets’a ˛i ˛i ˛ Gwiindaii (Living in the Chandalar Country), second edition, retranslated by Adeline Raboff (Fairbanks: Alaska Native Language Center, ). The stories appear here by permission of the publisher and the author. Katherine Peter, ‘‘Shaaghan (The Old Woman)’’ and ‘‘K’aiiheenjik,’’ were published in Dinjii Zhuu Gwandak (Gwich’in Stories) (Juneau: Alaska State Operated Schools, ). Gertie Tom, ‘‘Gyò Cho Chú (Living at Big Salmon, s and s),’’ ‘‘K’ènlū Mä¯n (Northern Lake, ),’’ and ‘‘K’ènlū Mä¯n (Northern Lake, ),’’ were pub-  Source Acknowledgments lished in Èkeyi: Gyò Cho Chú (My Country: Big Salmon River) (Whitehorse, Yukon: Yukon Native Language Centre, ). John Dickson, ‘‘Gédē´ni Gēs Gagáh Nédē (The Girl Who Lived with Salmon),’’ translated by Pat Moore, appears by permission of the translator. Maudie Dick, ‘‘Dzo ˛hdié’ Gū ˛h Chō Dzéhhı̄n (Dzo ˛hdié’ Kills the Giant Worm),’’ translated by Pat Moore, appears by permission of the translator. Angela Sidney, ‘‘Getting Married’’ and ‘‘The Stolen Woman,’’ were published in Julie Cruikshank, with Angela Sidney, Kitty Smith, and Annie Ned, Life Lived Like a Story: Life Stories of Three Yukon Native Elders (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, ; copyright 䉷  by the University of Nebraska Press). Annie Ned, ‘‘Our Shagóon, Our Family History’’ and ‘‘How First This Yukon Came to Be: Crow and Beaverman,’’ were published in Julie Cruikshank, with Angela Sidney, Kitty Smith, and Annie Ned, Life Lived Like a Story: Life Stories of Three Yukon Native Elders (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, ; copyright 䉷  by the University of Nebraska Press). Kitty Smith, ‘‘Naakw: Devilfish, or Octopus, Helper,’’ [To Build a Fire], and ‘‘The First Time They Knew K’och’èn, White Man,’’ were published in Julie Cruikshank, with Angela Sidney, Kitty Smith, and Annie Ned, Life Lived Like a Story: Life Stories of Three Yukon Native Elders (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, ; copyright 䉷  by the University of Nebraska Press). Mary Tyone, ‘‘Stso ˛o ˛ Shyaan O ˛ o ˛nign’: Ch’aldzeek Shyii Dineh Gaay Na’ithädn (My Old Grandmother: The Little Man Standing in the Moon),’’ ‘‘Dlign Mba’ Hehk ’aayh Ts’ä ˛’ (When the Tree Squirrels Cut Fish),’’ ‘‘Ch’o ˛o ˛t’üüdn Ch’aachin’ Shyiit Eedah (When Horsefly Was Living in a Stump),’’ and ‘‘Taatsaan’ Dzänh eh O ˛ o ˛nign’ (Raven and Muskrat Story),’’ were published in Ttheek’ädn Ut’iin Yaaniida ˛’ O ˛ o ˛nign’ (Old-time Stories of the Scottie Creek People): Stories told in Upper Tanana Athabaskan by Mary Tyone, Ts’ä ˛’ Yahnik, transcribed and edited by James Kari (Fairbanks: Alaska Native Language Center, ). The stories appear here by permission of the publisher and the author. Gaither Paul, ‘‘The Child Who Was Stolen by a Brush Indian’’ and ‘‘How Dentalium Necklaces Came to the Country,’’ were published in Stories for My Grandchildren (Fairbanks: Alaska Native Language Center, ). Peter John, chapter , ‘‘Stand for What Is Right’’ (‘‘I Learned the Indian Way’’ and ‘‘Strong People’’), selections from chapter , ‘‘Old Ways’’ (‘‘I Belong to My Mother’s Side’’ and ‘‘Try to Make Things’’), selection from chapter , ‘‘Set Your Mind’’ (‘‘Never Get Scared’’), and selections from chapter , ‘‘Out on Our Own’’ (‘‘Love Woods Life’’ and ‘‘I Don’t Go Around’’), were originally published in Peter John: Minto (Fairbanks: Spirit...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780803202368
MARC Record
OCLC
607194129
Pages
394
Launched on MUSE
2012-07-10
Language
English
Open Access
No
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