Acknowledgments [Includes Note on Sources]
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  vii So many years have passed since this book’s beginning that attempting to thank those who helped me along the way is daunting. My parents are first. Though Naomi and Joel T. Rosenthal are guilty of making an academic life look almost easy, they provide recompense with a number of other fine qualities. In this context, the most charming has been their willingness to dispense with decades of experience and declare this study worthy of publication from the very beginning. To my siblings, Jessica Benson (author of the most readable books produced by the family to date) and Matthew Rosenthal, I’ll say that one of the best parts of graduate school was getting to spend all that time together. Things are a little more global now, but I appreciate your support and company throughout the venture. I am proud to claim both David Garrett and Nora Jaffary as friends from that era of my life, David from the first week of classes and Nora from a few years later. They continue to be dear friends and, for me, role models. Through Nora I met Ed Osowski, whom I am proud to call a friend as well. Linda Green also provided much-needed words of encouragement for this project when I was a graduate student, at a time when such offerings were rare. New York did have other diversions, which may have slowed my research but were beneficial in other ways. I would like to thank Grupo Capoeira Brazil, led by Mestre Caxias , and through this group the capoeiristas I met and spent time with across the United States and Brazil. From the moment I arrived in Bogotá in 1994 I have been treated better than I have deserved by more people than I can name here. The place where the most important of these interactions took place was the Archivo General de la Nación, which remains an amazing place to work. In particular I would like to thank Adelida Sourdis, Yaneth Sandoval, Nazly González, Carlos Puentes , Enrique Ballesteros, and Leonardo Quintero. I am also grateful to the staff of the Biblioteca Nacional and the Academia Colombiana de Historia. Finally, Acknowledgments Rosenthal text3.indd 7 11/22/11 4:00 PM the friendship and support of Alberto Flores was crucial in helping me navigate this year in Bogotá. In Tunja Celina Trimiño opened her home, for which I am still thankful. I would also like to thank the staffs of the Archivo Regional de Boyacá, the Archivo Departamental de Boyacá, the library at the Universidad Pedagógica Tecnológica de Colombia, and everyone associated with the masters program in history there. I have benefited from the opportunity to present parts of this work at various conferences. Here I am grateful to the Conference on Latin American History, especially the Gran Colombia committee; LASA, particularly the Colombia section; the Asociación de Colombianistas; the New England Council on Latin American Studies; and the Society of Latin American Studies in the United Kingdom. Less institutionally, I have benefited from the company, ideas, and friendship of the community of historians and scholars who study Colombia. First I would like to acknowledge the extraordinary generosity of Jane Rausch, who has supported this project since we met at the AHA in Atlanta in 1996. She has read many drafts and is generally too kind to mention it when my work falls short of the standards she maintains. I would like to thank David Sowell, who has read at least two drafts of this work over the years, for reasons I have never been able to fathom, though self-interest prevented me from asking why he was willing to do so. Nancy Appelbaum was my first Colombianist friend, and I owe her for many things, including my introduction to Riosucio (whose people I would like to acknowledge for their generosity, hospitality, and the good times I have had there). I would also like to thank Michael Francis , Richard Goulet, David Sanders, Richard Stoller, Victor Uribe-Uran, Hayley Froysland, Brett Troyan, Robert Karl, Mary Roldán (a walking postdoc in Colombian history, and a generous one who has yet to collect on the many favors she has rendered), Claudia Leal, Shawn Van Ausdal, Javier Guerrero Baron, Hermes Tovar, Marcela Echeverri, Lina del Castillo, Meri Clark, Jamie Sanders, Kris Lane, Hillel Soifer, Robert Karl, Rebecca Tally, and Aims McGuiness. In one way or another I have been aided by their work and company. I...


pdf

Subject Headings

  • Government monopolies -- Colombia -- History -- 19th century.
  • Salt industry and trade -- Colombia -- History -- 19th century.
  • Salt mines and mining -- Government policy -- Colombia -- History -- 19th century.
  • Colombia -- Politics and government -- 19th century.
  • Boyacá (Colombia : Dept.) -- History -- 19th century.
  • Colombia -- Economic conditions -- 19th century.
  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access