restricted access 46 Confronting the Mob
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249 Secluded in a house at Berwyn, with only Murphy and my maid, I had plenty of time to think over the most recent events. They preyed on my mind. The future appeared blank, for I had no income, and now I valued my life too much to go to the syndicate or attempt to explain my position to the proper authorities. I marveled that during the investigation, the things that had appeared so plain to me could not be uncovered for the jury. Many of the facts were common knowledge, even to the newspapers . I could not help but believe these facts had reached the jury, but I could not understand why, if they had, there were no disclosures made. In the very first place, if Goldblatt did not drive Gus to his doom, then how did he get possession of the keys to the car? If what Goldblatt said was true, that the keys had been returned to him by another individual—then who was it? If Goldblatt convinced the authorities that he had no connection with Gus other than to peddle alcohol for him at one time, then why were they seen constantly together in public places, most often at the clubs on the North Side? If Charles H. Weber did not know my husband, what kind of enterprise were they in together before the return of legal beer? Why was Gus Winkeler a daily visitor at Weber’s real estate office at 2922SouthportAvenue,whereArthurSchroederandCharlesF.Conrad also made their headquarters? 46 Confronting the Mob 250 al capone and his american boys What was the office on the floor above that real estate office, and if Gus, Weber and Goldblatt did not sell illegal beer to North Side speakeasies from that office, then what did they sell? If it wasn’t beer that was stored in the small garage which still stands at the rear of that office, then what was it used for? If Weber did not know Gus Winkeler, how was it he never saw him when he daily went through the real estate office to get to the office above it? Why was the office and garage vacated when the new place opened at 1414 Roscoe Street, where my husband was killed? If Gus Winkeler didn’t put up the money to open the Charles H. Weber Distributing Company—then who did? If Weber owned it, then why did Gus ride the trucks the night beer came back? If Gus had nothing to do with the distributing company, why was he always allowed to go through the books whenever he put in an appearance ? Why did the employees always put on such a great display of being busy when Gus called, unless they knew he had the power to discharge them? Why did office manager Edward Leisk say, “If he (Winkeler) don’t quit coming around here everyone will know he’s got a slice of this”? If Gus had nothing to do with it, why was he able to order beer bought by the Charles H. Weber Distributing Company, then have it sent to branch distributors in surrounding towns? Why weren’t the employees at the distributing plant asked why they had never seen Gus when he made an inspection of the place every time he went there? Why was it necessary to finally arrange a private office for Gus at the distributing company? Thinking it over, I could see that the same questions, if answered truthfully, would have revealed much in connection with a startling number of cabarets, clubs, and saloons on the North Side. In all of them Gus was almost a daily visitor. He came and went in the business offices as he wished and made inspections of the books whenever he felt it necessary. Confronting the Mob 251 He gave orders, and employees would hasten to obey. Why weren’t these employees asked about his visits? Why weren’t they asked why they took orders from Gus Winkeler? Of course, Gus never kept records of his business. He took his share in cash, he did not write checks, and in all cases he took great care to remain in the background. But surely, in the presence of so many facts, some truth could have been found that would certainly have identified him with the properties he owned. In asking myself these questions, I was not malicious. I entertained no hope of recovering the property, but was only amazed that the...


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Subject Headings

  • Crime -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century.
  • Murder -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century.
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