restricted access 27 “The Informer”
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“Are you certain?” I gasped. “Positively,” he answered, and his voice was emphatic. WithoutanotherwordIstaggeredoutofhisoffice,andrantomycar. I was ill before I left the office. I had received a terrible shock while there, andhowIdrovefromIndependenceBoulevardto3300LakeShoreDrive without being killed is a miracle. I was in a daze and do not remember one detail of the trip. Gus was not at home. When I investigated I found the boys had taken Nellie to a place on the South Side, and were hurriedly removing Ted’s belongings to an apartment at the Lincoln Park Arms where Gus and Ted maintained an office. They knew that before long the police would be there to investigate the death of Newberry, and they did not want a shred of his property on the place. I hurried on down to the eleventh floor of the apartment house where Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sherman live. They were good friends of both Gus and Ted. Eddie Sherman operated the fashionable Sky High Club atop the Lincoln Park Arms for Gus. Mrs. Sherman arrived at her apartment just as I did. She had been at the beauty parlor and when her maid had telephoned her, she had left the shop before her hair was done, and like myself was nearly hysterical. Both Mrs. Sherman and myself felt that Newberry’s death might be the beginning of the end for both Gus and Eddie. Besides that she thought a great deal of Ted, who visited at the Sherman home often. 27 “The Infor mer” 164 “The Informer” 165 We were walking the floor in tears when Gus, Eddie and some of the boys came in. Seeing my condition Gus took me aside and said encouragingly, “Now snap out of it and don’t make yourself sick.” He assured me there was no immediate danger. “But Gus,” I argued, “if they have taken Ted they will take you next.” “Don’tworry,”hesaid.“BigMikecantakecareofhimselfandheisn’t afraid of any Dago who ever breathed. Stop crying.” I had no further opportunity to talk to him, but later in the evening we drove over to the South Side to the home of a politician who was friendly to Gus and Ted. Nellie had been taken to the politician’s house. We did not return home that night, for we knew the police would want to question Gus, but instead spent the night at a hotel. When we were alone I asked Gus if he couldn’t have saved Ted. “God, Honey,” Gus said distractedly, “I did everything I could for him, but this was a showdown. If I had bucked them any further they would havefinishedmeofflast night too.Theyhadmadeuptheirminds, and there was nothing I could do. They kept me with them all night so I couldn’t warn Ted.” In answer to my question Gus said their decision to give Ted “the works” was prompted by his plot to have Nitti killed. “What I can’t understand,” I said in bewilderment, “is where they got the straight dope on the plot unless some one double-crossed Ted.” “That’s just about what happened,” Gus replied after a minute of reflection. “You remember when Dr. Omens was at Newberry’s house a few nights ago. You remember everyone got to talking about the Nitti shooting . Maybe you noticed how interested Dr. Omens was, and how he asked Ted all kinds of questions. “He kept everybody drinking, especially Ted, and kept dragging him off in the corner and pumping him. Well, finally Ted got pretty tight and he told him about it. “That was what Omens had come for. He went straight to Nitti with whathehadlearned.Sober,Tedwouldn’thavetoldasoulaboutthatplot, but signed his death warrant that night with a whisky bottle. 166 al capone and his american boys “With that information in Dr. Omens’ hands, there was nothing more I could do to save Ted. He was ripe for the mark down. From here onoutkeepaclosedtongueinyourheadwhenyougotothatdoctor.He’s made some cracks to me and some to other people about me.” About two weeks later I went to Dr. Omens’ office again for a treatment . “The Informer” 167 “Say, is Gus mad at me?” he asked. “I haven’t heard from him in a long time.” “Don’t be silly,” was my laughing reply. I told Gus what the doctor had said as soon as I got home. “The next time he says anything about it, you tell him this—,” Gus said, and gave me a message for the doctor. A week later I...


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Subject Headings

  • Crime -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century.
  • Murder -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century.
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