restricted access 7. Speechreading Exercises
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Speechreading Tests and Methods information about the story. Then she or he tells the story and asks questions about it. c. The teacher may drill on vocabulary used in the story, then tell the story and ask questions. d. The student may identify each sentence individually after which the teacher presents the entire story for meaning. 6. Quizzes, Riddles, or Games. Crossword puzzles may be adapted for speechreading practice. Team competition among two groups in a speechreading class can enliven a lesson. The speechreading exercises in chapter 7 contain many examples of such activities. 7. Skits and Conversations. The teacher and a helper or two students may present a dialogue about some real life situation. The others must correctly answer questions or perform activities indicating understanding. This type of exercise is handled in much the same way as the MorkovinMoore films. Other Synthetic Exercises. Raymond Hull (1976) has developed some exercises that train the speechreader to use the linguistic redundancy of language. He believes that speechreading is a purely synthetic skill and that skill development should be based entirely on mind training. Following are descriptions ofseveral ofhis procedures. 1. Right and Wrong Information. The teacher first writes a sentence on the board and then speaks a sentence that may be the same or different. The student must decide whether the two sentences are the same or different and, if different, in what way. For example, the sentence on the board might be, Where are you going? The spoken sentence might be, When are you going? 2. Filling in the Gaps. The teacher writes a sentence on the board but leaves out key words or phrases. She or he then speaks the sentence and the student must identify the missing words. For example, Written sentence: What is today? Spoken sentence: What time is dinner today? 98 3. Structure of the Language. This procedure is similar to filling in the gaps. The teacher writes a sentence on the board with all words missing except one. Then the sentence is spoken. If the student cannot identify it, another word is added, and the sentence is spoken again. Words are continually added until the sentence is understood. For example, ____ meat _ ____ meat expensive. The meat expensive. The meat is expensive. The meat is too expensive. 4. How Would You Say It? How Would the Listener Say It? The teacher identifies a situation such as going to the doctor. The students are asked to suggest sentences that people might say in that situation. The class practices speechreading the sentences. Cued Speech In chapter 3 two major problems of speechreading discussed were that (1) many of the sounds of English are not visible on the lips, and (2) many sounds look identical or similar on the lips. Therefore, a skilled speechreader must rely heavily on the use of language context. The orally educated, prelingually deaf child must learn language largely through speechreading and whatever residual hearing is available. Because speechreading is highly dependent on knowledge of language, the prelingually deaf child is faced with a significant problem. The postlingually hearing-impaired adult who has developed a mental language model can more easily fill in what the eye cannot see. Still, many hearing-impaired adults find it difficult to develop the skill of educated guessing. Their speechreading skills are limited by the problems of visibility and homopheneity. Speechreading Tests and Methods information about the story. Then she or he tells the story and asks questions about it. c. The teacher may drill on vocabulary used in the story, then tell the story and ask questions. d. The student may identify each sentence individually after which the teacher presents the entire story for meaning. 6. Quizzes, Riddles, or Games. Crossword puzzles may be adapted for speechreading practice. Team competition among two groups in a speechreading class can enliven a lesson. The speechreading exercises in chapter 7 contain many examples of such activities. 7. Skits and Conversations. The teacher and a helper or two students may present a dialogue about some real life situation. The others must correctly answer questions or perform activities indicating understanding. This type of exercise is handled in much the same way as the MorkovinMoore films. Other Synthetic Exercises. Raymond Hull (1976) has developed some exercises that train the speechreader to use the linguistic redundancy of language. He believes that speechreading is a purely synthetic skill and that skill development should be based entirely on mind training. Following are descriptions ofseveral ofhis procedures...


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