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Limitations ofSpeechreading place himself or herself at the proper distance from the speaker regardless of the situation. If a visual problem is correctable by eyeglasses, the speechreader must always use the eyeglasses. Visual attention is very important. The speechreader must watch the speaker at all times to follow conversation even though continual concentration is tiring. If visual attention is diverted from the speaker even for a few minutes, important parts of the conversation are lost. People differ in their ability and willingness to concentrate in this manner. Although everyone needs periods of rest from speechreading, the amount of needed rest varies from person to person. The inability to constantly focus on the speaker's face is definitely a limitation of speechreading. Another problem interfering with understanding is the speechreader's lack offamiliarity with the language ofthe speaker or the topic ofconversation . The importance ofknowing English vocabulary and grammar has already been discussed in chapter 1. In addition to knowing English, it is important to be familiar with the topic of conversation . An individual will have trouble speechreading when the subject being discussed is unfamiliar. For example, ifthe subject is the condition ofthe stock market and you know little about the stock market, you will not be familiar with the important vocabulary and concepts. Complete understanding may not occur even ifyou have normal hearing, but the situation is significantly more difficult ifyou are depending on speechreading . Ifa speaker describes an exciting event reported in the newspaper, the speechreader's understanding is limited ifhe or she has not read the newspaper. The speechreader needs to be well-informed about topics ofgeneral interest as well as topics ofspecific interest to people he or she associates with frequently. Under standing at a movie, play, or meeting is made easier when the plot or agenda is known in advance. 12 The attitude of the speechreader is very important . A person will speechread best when the following occur: 1. He or she tries to relax and doesn't strain to catch every word. 2. He or she is willing to guess. Some people just can't allow themselves to guess. They have to be sure of every word. While the speechreader is trying to understand every word, the speaker has continued with new conversation and the speechreader is lost. By the time the introduction to a story has been figured out, the speaker has finished the story. 3. He or she maintains a sense of humor. There are times when a speechreader gets confused, makes mistakes, and feels foolish. Ifhe or she can laugh at an error instead of becoming upset, the speechreader not only helps himself or herself but also the speaker who may become embarrassed. As speechreading skills improve, it is hoped mistakes will become less frequent. 4. He or she is willing to admit when something is not understood. There are many ways a speaker can help a speechreader. However, the speechreader must be willing to ask for help and also tell the speaker how to help. The speechreader must be assertive in admitting difficulty rather than passively pretending to understand. The use ofhelping strategies is discussed at length in chapter 4, but for now it is important to remember that the first thing a hearingimpaired person must do is say "I didn't understand. " Problems Relating to the Nature of Speech Speechreading is limited by the fact that, at best, speech is only partially visible. First, normal speech is very rapid. Ordinary speech averages about thirteen speech sounds per second. The eye is capable of seeing only eight to ten movements per second. Therefore, the average speechreader will not see all the speech sounds. When a speaker Limitations ofSpeechreading place himself or herself at the proper distance from the speaker regardless of the situation. If a visual problem is correctable by eyeglasses, the speechreader must always use the eyeglasses. Visual attention is very important. The speechreader must watch the speaker at all times to follow conversation even though continual concentration is tiring. If visual attention is diverted from the speaker even for a few minutes, important parts of the conversation are lost. People differ in their ability and willingness to concentrate in this manner. Although everyone needs periods of rest from speechreading, the amount of needed rest varies from person to person. The inability to constantly focus on the speaker's face is definitely a limitation of speechreading. Another problem interfering with understanding is the speechreader's lack offamiliarity with the language...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781563681806
Related ISBN
9780930323325
MARC Record
OCLC
794700904
Pages
152
Launched on MUSE
2012-02-08
Language
English
Open Access
No
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