restricted access Acknowledgments
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Preface According to estimates, there are approximately 20 million children and adults in the United States with some degree of hearing impairment (Chalfant & Sheffelin, 1969).* Habilitative/rehabilitative considerations are of primary concern for these people. Speechreading is an important part of habilitation or rehabilitation because all hearing-impaired individuals use this skill to some extent. Although speechreading has been taught in various ways for many years, only a few books are available explaining its many aspects. These books are texts written for the professional or professional-in-training and are oriented toward theory and research rather than the practical needs of the hearing-impaired person. There are also consumer-oriented books consisting only of speechreading exercises but no consumer-oriented text on the nature of speechreading itself. The goal of Speechreading: A Way to Improve Understanding is to present the nature and process of speechreading and its benefits and limitations. The book was designed as a source of information for hearing-impaired adults of all ages and degrees of hearing loss, their families and friends, and parents of hearingimpaired children. It is hoped the book will clarify commonly held misconceptions and enable hearing-impaired people to use speechreading wisely and well. It is also our hope that the book may aid professionals and professionalsin -training in providing habilitative/rehabilitative services in classrooms and clinics. Chapter 1 discusses principles of speechreading, its role in overall communication , how it can be used with residual hearing, and differences between good and poor speechreaders. Chapter 2 deals with the limitations of speechreading as they relate to the speaker, environment, and speechreader. It is important that these limitations be recognized so that compensatory strategies can be developed. In chapter 3 specific limitations relating to lack of visibility of some of the sounds of English are described. In addition, the issue of homopheneity, or the fact that some sounds look alike, is dealt with. Chapter 4 discusses the desirability of assertive behavior as opposed to passive or aggressive behavior. Difficult communication situations and appropriate strategies to manage them are described. In chapter 5 programmed exercises illustrating the use of these communication strategies are presented. it is our hope that the material in these two chapters will help the reader cope with difficulties for which speechreading alone is insufficient. *Chelfant, J. C., & Sheffelin, M. A. (1969). Central processing dysfunction in children. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health, Education & Welfare. v Preface According to estimates, there are approximately 20 million children and adults in the United States with some degree of hearing impairment (Chalfant & Sheffelin, 1969).* Habilitative/rehabilitative considerations are of primary concern for these people. Speechreading is an important part of habilitation or rehabilitation because all hearing-impaired individuals use this skill to some extent. Although speechreading has been taught in various ways for many years, only a few books are available explaining its many aspects. These books are texts written for the professional or professional-in-training and are oriented toward theory and research rather than the practical needs of the hearing-impaired person. There are also consumer-oriented books consisting only of speechreading exercises but no consumer-oriented text on the nature of speechreading itself. The goal of Speechreading: A Way to Improve Understanding is to present the nature and process of speechreading and its benefits and limitations. The book was designed as a source of information for hearing-impaired adults of all ages and degrees of hearing loss, their families and friends, and parents of hearingimpaired children. It is hoped the book will clarify commonly held misconceptions and enable hearing-impaired people to use speechreading wisely and well. It is also our hope that the book may aid professionals and professionalsin -training in providing habilitative/rehabilitative services in classrooms and clinics. Chapter 1 discusses principles of speechreading, its role in overall communication , how it can be used with residual hearing, and differences between good and poor speechreaders. Chapter 2 deals with the limitations of speechreading as they relate to the speaker, environment, and speechreader. It is important that these limitations be recognized so that compensatory strategies can be developed. In chapter 3 specific limitations relating to lack of visibility of some of the sounds of English are described. In addition, the issue of homopheneity, or the fact that some sounds look alike, is dealt with. Chapter 4 discusses the desirability of assertive behavior as opposed to passive or aggressive behavior. Difficult communication situations and appropriate strategies to manage them are described. In chapter...


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