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Race, Space, and the Evolution of Black Los Angeles 55 contributed larger and larger streams of new persons of African descent to the Los Angeles area during this period. By 2008 there were an estimated 90,391 persons of sub-Saharan African and/or Caribbean ancestry living in Los Angeles County, constituting nearly 10 percent of the county’s total Table 1.8 Growth of Black Population after 1940 Year Total Population Black Population % Black % Growth 1940 2,790,359 70,781 3 1950 4,281,997 222,534 5 214 1960 6,038,771 458,947 8 106 1970 7,044,641 759,091 11 65 1980 7,506,690 927,823 12 22 1990 8,863,164 992,674 11 7 2000 9,519,338 930,957 10 –6 2008 10,024,081 944,798 9 1 Source: U.S. Census 1940–2000. Table 1.9 Regional Share of the Black Population Living in Los Angeles Area Counties 1960, 1990 and 2008 Black Total County Population Share (%) Population Share (%) Ventura 1960 3,584 0.7 199,138 3.0 1990 15,629 1.3 669,016 5.0 2008 16,671 1.2 806,938 4.4 Orange 1960 3,519 0.7 703,925 9.0 1990 42,681 3.0 2,410,556 16.0 2008 58,036 4.3 3,031,930 16.7 Riverside 1960 12,554 2.6 306,191 4.0 1990 63,591 5.0 1,170,413 8.0 2008 149,471 10.9 2,233,496 12.3 San Bernardino 1960 17,122 3.5 503,591 6.0 1990 114,934 9.0 1,418,380 10.0 2008 196,392 14.4 2,108,797 11.6 Los Angeles 1960 458,947 92.5 6,038,771 78.0 1990 992,974 81.0 8,863,167 61.0 2008 944,798 69.0 10,024,081 55.1 Region Total 1960 495,726 100 7,751,616 100 1990 1,229,809 100 14,531,529 100 2008 1,365,368 100 18,205,242 100 Source: U.S. Census, 1960 and 1990, and 2008 Population Estimates. 56 Paul Robinson black population. Over 61,000 sub-Saharan Africans resided in Los Angeles County, including more than 7,000 Nigerians, nearly 5,000 Ethiopians, and more than 1,000 Ghanaians. These continental Africans were joined by more than 28,000 Caribbean/West Indian blacks, including more than 11,500 Belizians, more than 9,900 Jamaicans, more than 1,900 Haitians, and more than 1,700 Trinidadians. These newer black immigrants tended to cluster in and around existing African American settlement areas, particularly around the Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw neighborhoods and other parts of South Los Angeles (see fig. 1.4). As the first decade of the 2000s wound to a close, the question remained what these new sources of black immigration would mean for the cultural fabric of Black Los Angeles. Black immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa tended to share residential space with American-born blacks but their cultural backgrounds and social identities were often vastly divergent . As the county’s non-native black population grew throughout the Figure 1.4. Population Density of sub-Saharan African and Caribbean Origin Persons in Los Angeles County zip codes, 2008. Race, Space, and the Evolution of Black Los Angeles 57 decade, the diverse groups comprising it increasingly challenged common assumptions about the people and spaces comprising “Black Los Angeles.” N o t e s 1. Mason, Los Angeles under the Spanish Flag. 2. Bandini, History of California. 3. Defined as mixed African race, particularly of black and white ancestry. 4. Forbes, “The Early African Heritage of California.” 5. Ibid. 6. Campbell, “Heaven’s Ghetto?” 7. Forbes, “The Early African Heritage of California.” 8. Mason, Los Angeles under the Spanish Flag. 9. Ibid. 10. Ibid. 11. Ibid. 12. Forbes, “The Early African Heritage of California.” 13. Ibid. 14. Bandini, History of California. 15. Bancroft, History of California, vol. 2. 16. Lapp, Blacks in Gold Rush California. 17. Bancroft, History of California, vol. 1. 18. Ibid. 19. Forbes, “The Early African Heritage of California.” 20. U.S. Census Bureau, “Seventh Census of the United States, 1850.” 21. The racially mixed nature of the Californio population most likely made it very difficult for American census takers to consistently record the racial classification of these families. The job of the census taker was to record the race of the individuals in a household...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780814773062
Print ISBN
9780814737347
MARC Record
OCLC
697182006
Pages
432
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
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