230. Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994, November 2, 1994
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356 to receive under section 102 or any other applicable Federal law. “(b) Federal Trust Responsibilities.— Nothing in this Act shall be construed to diminish the Federal trust responsibility to Indian tribes, individual Indians, or Indians with trust allotments. . . .” [U.S. Statutes at Large, 108:4270–77.] 230. Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994 November 2, 1994 Because of criticism of the action of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in acknowledging Indian tribes and in dropping tribes from the list of recognized entities, Congress strongly reasserted its authority over Indian affairs. An Act to provide for the annual publication of a list of federally recognized Indian tribes, and for other purposes. . . . . TITLE I—WITHDRAWAL OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OR RECOGNITION . . . . sec. 103. findings. The Congress finds that— (1) the Constitution, as interpreted by Federal case law, invests Congress with plenary authority over Indian Affairs; (2) ancillary to that authority, the United States has a trust responsibility to recognized Indian tribes, maintains a government-to-government relationship with those tribes, and recognizes the sovereignty of those tribes; (3) Indian tribes presently may be recognized by Act of Congress; by the administrative procedures set forth in part 83 of the Code of Federal Regulations denominated “Procedures for Establishing that an American Indian Group Exists as an Indian Tribe;” or by a decision of a United States court; (4) a tribe which has been recognized in one of these manners may not be terminated except by an Act of Congress; (5) Congress has expressly repudiated the policy of terminating recognized Indian tribes, and has actively sought to restore recognition to tribes that previously have been terminated; (6) the Secretary of the Interior is charged with the responsibility of keeping a list of all federally recognized tribes; (7) the list published by the Secretary should be accurate, regularly updated, and regularly published, since it is used by the various departments and agencies of the United States to determine the eligibility of certain groups to receive services from the United States; and (8) the list of federally recognized tribes which the Secretary publishes should reflect all of the federally recognized Indian tribes in the United States which are eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians . sec. 104. publication of list of recognized tribes. (a) Publication of the List.—The Secretary shall publish in the Federal Register a list of all Indian tribes which the Secretary recognizes to be eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. (b) Frequency of Publication.—The list shall be published within 60 days of enactment of this Act, and annually on or before every January 30 thereafter. TITLE II—CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIAN TRIBES OF ALASKA . . . . sec. 202. findings. The Congress finds and declares that— (1) the United States has acknowledged the Central Council of Tlingit and 357 Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska pursuant to the Act of June 19, 1935 . . . as a federally recognized Indian tribe; (2) on October 21, 1993, the Secretary of the Interior published a list of federally recognized Indian tribes pursuant to part 83 of title 25 of the Code of Federal Regulations which omitted the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska; (3) the Secretary does not have the authority to terminate the federally recognized status of an Indian tribe as determined by Congress; (4) the Secretary may not administratively diminish the privileges and immunities of federally recognized Indian tribes without the consent of Congress; and (5) the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska continues to be a federally recognized Indian tribe. sec. 203. reaffirmation of tribal status. The Congress reaffirms and acknowledges that the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska is a federally recognized Indian tribe. . . . [U.S. Statutes at Large, 108:4791–92.] 231. Indian Sacred Sites Executive Order 13007 May 24, 1996 To help protect sites held sacred by Indians, President Clinton issued this executive order in regard to federal lands. This was part of an ongoing policy to protect Indian religious practices. By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, in furtherance of Federal treaties , and in order to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, it is hereby ordered: Section 1. Accommodation of Sacred Sites. (a) In managing Federal...