221. Indian Tribal Justice Act, December 3, 1993
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342 services performed by the United States for tribes because of their status as Indian tribes. For the purpose of eligibility for Federal services made available to members of federally recognized Indian tribes because of their status as Indian tribal members, Members of the Tribe in the Tribe’s service area shall be deemed to be residing on or near a reservation . (c) Repeal of Termination Act.—The Termination Act is repealed. . . . [U.S. Statutes at Large, 107:1118–21.] 221. Indian Tribal Justice Act December 3, 1993 One of the fundamental aspects of tribal self-governance is the creation and operation of effective tribal courts. In 1993 Congress provided extensive help to the tribes to improve their court systems, by technical services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs and by substantial appropriations. An Act to assist the development of tribal judicial systems, and for other purposes. . . . . sec. 2. findings. The Congress finds and declares that— (1) there is a government-to-government relationship between the United States and each Indian tribe; (2) the United States has a trust responsibility to each tribal government that includes the protection of the sovereignty of each tribal government; (3) Congress, through statutes, treaties , and the exercise of administrative authorities , has recognized the self-determination , self-reliance, and inherent sovereignty of Indian tribes; (4) Indian tribes possess the inherent authority to establish their own form of government, including tribal justice systems ; (5) tribal justice systems are an essential part of tribal governments and serve as important forums for ensuring public health and safety and the political integrity of tribal governments; (6) Congress and the Federal courts have repeatedly recognized tribal justice systems as the appropriate forums for the adjudication of disputes affecting personal and property rights; (7) traditional tribal justice practices are essential to the maintenance of the culture and identity of Indian tribes and to the goals of this Act; (8) tribal justice systems are inadequately funded, and the lack of adequate funding impairs their operations; and (9) tribal government involvement in and commitment to improving tribal justice systems is essential to the accomplishment of the goals of this Act. . . . TITLE I—TRIBAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS sec. 101. office of tribal justice support. (a) Establishment.—There is hereby established within the Bureau the Office of Tribal Justice Support. The purpose of the Office shall be to further the development, operation, and enhancement of tribal justice systems and Courts of Indian Offenses. (b) Transfer of Existing Functions and Personnel.—All functions performed before the date of the enactment of this Act by the Branch of Judicial Services of the Bureau and all personnel assigned to such Branch as of the date of the enactment of this Act are hereby transferred to the Office of Tribal Justice Support. . . . (c) Functions.—In addition to the functions transferred to the Office pursuant to subsection (b), the Office shall perform the following functions: (1) Provide funds to Indian tribes and tribal organizations for the development, enhancement, and continuing operation of tribal justice systems. (2) Provide technical assistance and training, including programs of continuing education and training for personnel of Courts of Indian Offenses. 342 services performed by the United States for tribes because of their status as Indian tribes. For the purpose of eligibility for Federal services made available to members of federally recognized Indian tribes because of their status as Indian tribal members, Members of the Tribe in the Tribe’s service area shall be deemed to be residing on or near a reservation . (c) Repeal of Termination Act.—The Termination Act is repealed. . . . [U.S. Statutes at Large, 107:1118–21.] 221. Indian Tribal Justice Act December 3, 1993 One of the fundamental aspects of tribal self-governance is the creation and operation of effective tribal courts. In 1993 Congress provided extensive help to the tribes to improve their court systems, by technical services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs and by substantial appropriations. An Act to assist the development of tribal judicial systems, and for other purposes. . . . . sec. 2. findings. The Congress finds and declares that— (1) there is a government-to-government relationship between the United States and each Indian tribe; (2) the United States has a trust responsibility to each tribal government that includes the protection of the sovereignty of each tribal government; (3) Congress, through statutes, treaties , and the exercise of administrative authorities , has recognized the self-determination , self-reliance, and inherent sovereignty of Indian tribes; (4) Indian...