191. Statement on Indian Health Programs, March 2, 1981
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299 the Passamaquoddy Tribe or the Penobscot Nation, respectively, and agreed to by the Secretary. . . . (c) There is hereby established in the United States Treasury a fund to be known as the Maine Indian Claims Land Acquisition Fund in which $54,500,000 shall be deposited following the appropriation of sums authorized by section 14 of this Act. (d) The principal of the land acquisition fund shall be apportioned as follows: (1) $900,000 to be held in trust for the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians; (2) $26,800,000 to be held in trust for the Passamaquoddy Tribe; and (3) $26,800,000 to be held in trust for the Penobscot Nation. The Secretary is authorized and directed to expend, at the request of the affected tribe, nation or band, the principal and any income accruing to the respective portions of the land acquisition fund for the purpose of acquiring land or natural resources for the Passamaquoddy Tribe, the Penobscot Nation, and the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians and for no other purpose. . . . Sec. 6. (h) Except as otherwise provided in this Act, the laws and regulations of the United States which are generally applicable to Indians, Indian nations, or tribes or bands of Indians or to lands owned by or held in trust for Indians, Indian nations, or tribes or bands of Indians shall be applicable in the State of Maine, except that no law or regulation of the United States (1) which accords or relates to a special status or right or to any Indian, Indian nation, tribe of band of Indians, Indian lands, Indian reservations, Indian country, Indian territory or land held in trust for Indians, and also (2) which affects or preempts the civil, criminal, or regulatory jurisdiction of the State of Maine, including, without limitation, laws of the State relating to land use or environmental matters, shall apply within the State. (i) As federally recognized Indian tribes, the Passamaquoddy Tribe, the Penobscot Nation, and the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians shall be eligible to receive all of the financial benefits which the United States provides to Indians, Indian nations, or tribes or bands of Indians to the same extent and subject to the same eligibility criteria generally applicable to other Indians, Indian nations or tribes or bands of Indians. The Passamaquoddy Tribe, the Penobscot Nation, and the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians shall be treated in the same manner as other federally recognized tribes for the purposes of Federal taxation and any lands which are held by the respective tribe, nation, or band subject to a restriction against alienation or which are held in trust for the benefit of the respective tribe, nation, or band shall be considered Federal Indian reservations for purposes of Federal taxation. Sec. 7. (a) The Passamaquoddy Tribe, the Penobscot Nation, and the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians may each organize for its common welfare and adopt an appropriate instrument in writing to govern the affairs of the tribe, nation, or band when each is acting in its governmental capacity. . . . [U.S. Statutes at Large, 94:1785–89, 1793– 95.] 191. Statement on Indian Health Programs March 2, 1981 Indian health continued to be a vital concern of the federal government. The advances made by special legislation and by ongoing programs were described by Dr. Emery A. Johnson, director of the Indian Health Service, in appropriation hearings. I am pleased to appear before you today to discuss the programs of the Indian Health Service (IHS). As you know, the IHS is a constituent agency of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Public Health Service and is charged with administering the principal Federal health programs for Indian and Alaska Native citizens. Although this Department has within its purview a variety of health programs, funding mechanisms, and health care payment mechanisms which 300 impact on Indian and Alaska Native people, it has a special and unique responsibility to our Indian citizens. When reviewing the legislative and programmatic events of the past decade or so, we may fail to see that these events are actually a part of a pattern and if one examines this pattern, it becomes readily apparent that the present Federal Indian policy did not happen by fiat but is the logical outgrowth of a growing awareness of Indian needs. The decade of the seventies was to witness significant change in the structure of programs designed to provide health services to Indian people...


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