restricted access 178. Final Report of the American Indian Policy Review CommissionMay17, 1977
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281 TITLE III—HEALTH FACILITIES construction and renovation of service facilities Sec. 301. (a) The Secretary, acting through the Service, is authorized to expend over the seven-fiscal-year period beginning after the date of the enactment of this Act the sums authorized by subsection (b) for the construction and renovation of hospitals, health centers, health stations, and other facilities of the Service. . . . construction of safe water and sanitary waste disposal facilities Sec. 302. (a) During the seven-fiscal-year period beginning after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary is authorized to expend under section 7 of the Act of August 5, 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2004a), the sums authorized under subsection (b) to supply unmet needs for safe water and sanitary waste disposal facilities in existing and new Indian homes and communities. . . . preference to indians and indian firms Sec. 303. (a) The Secretary, acting through the Service, may utilize the negotiating authority of the Act of June 25, 1910 (25 U.S.C. 47), to give preference to any Indian or any enterprise, partnership, corporation , or other type of business organization owned and controlled by an Indian or Indians including former or currently federally recognized Indian tribes in the State of New York . . . in the construction and renovation of Service facilities pursuant to section 301 and in the construction of safe water and sanitary waste disposal facilities pursuant to section 302. . . . TITLE V—HEALTH SERVICES FOR URBAN INDIANS purpose Sec. 501. The purpose of this title is to encourage the establishment of programs in urban areas to make health services more accessible to the urban Indian population. contracts with urban indian organizations Sec. 502. The Secretary, acting through the Service, shall enter into contracts with urban Indian organizations to assist such organizations to establish and administer, in the urban centers in which such organizations are situated, programs which meet the requirements set forth in sections 503 and 504. . . . TITLE VI—AMERICAN INDIAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE; FEASIBILITY STUDY feasibility study Sec. 601. The Secretary, in consultation with Indian tribes and appropriate Indian organizations, shall conduct a study to determine the need for, and the feasibility of, establishing a school of medicine to train Indians to provide health services for Indians. Within one year of the date of the enactment of this Act the Secretary shall complete such study and shall report to the Congress findings and recommendations based on such study. . . . [U.S. Statutes at Large, 90:1400–1407, 1410–12.] 178. Final Report of the American Indian Policy Review Commission May 17, 1977 The American Indian Policy Review Commission in 1976 and 1977 published the reports of its task forces and a final summary report of the whole commission. The report adopted controversial views favoring Indian sovereignty and an expanded federal trust responsibility, which in turn elicited a vigorous dissenting opinion from the vice chairman, Representative Lloyd Meeds. There were 206 specific recommendations in the report, but in the end the commission’s work was largely ineffective. 282 A POLICY FOR THE FUTURE This final report of the American Indian Policy Review Commission represents 2 years of intensive investigative work encompassing the entire field of Federal-Indian relations . The last such investigation occurred almost 50 years ago. The conclusions of that investigation and its condemnation of the policies which had governed Federal administration over the preceding 50 years brought an abrupt shift in the statutory policies governing the Federal-Indian relations, a complete repudiation of the policies which had controlled from the late 1800’s to the mid1930 ’s. And yet the American Indian today finds himself in a position little better than that which he enjoyed in 1928 when the Meriam Report was issued. It has been the fortune of this Commission to be the first in the long history of this Nation to listen attentively to the voice of the Indian rather than the Indian expert. The findings and recommendations which appear in this report are founded on that Indian voice. It can only be hoped that this Commission will be seen as a watershed in the long and often tarnished history of this country’s treatment of its original people. What are the explanations for the circumstances in which the Indian finds himself today? First and foremost are the consistently damaging Federal policies of the past—policies which sought through the first three-quarters of the 19th century to remove the Indian people from the midst of the European settlers...


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