136. Bursum Bill1922
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216 An Act authorizing appropriations and expenditures for the administration of Indian affairs , and for other purposes. Be it enacted . . . , That the Bureau of Indian Affairs, under the supervision of the Secretary of the Interior, shall direct, supervise , and expend such moneys as Congress may from time to time appropriate, for the benefit, care, and assistance of the Indians throughout the United States for the following purposes: General support and civilization, including education. For relief of distress and conservation of health. For industrial assistance and advancement and general administration of Indian property . For extension, improvement, operation, and maintenance of existing Indian irrigation systems and for development of water supplies. For the enlargement, extension, improvement , and repair of the buildings and grounds of existing plants and projects. For the employment of inspectors, supervisors , superintendents, clerks, field matrons , farmers, physicians, Indian police, Indian judges, and other employees. For the suppression of traffic in intoxicating liquor and deleterious drugs. For the purchase of horse-drawn and motor-propelled passenger-carrying vehicles for official use. And for general and incidental expenses in connection with the administration of Indian affairs. [U.S. Statutes at Large, 42:208–9.] 136. Bursum Bill 1922 In 1922 Senator Holm O. Bursum of New Mexico introduced a bill to quiet title to lands within the Pueblo Indian land grants. The bill would have given strong advantage to the whites in their disputes over land title with the Pueblos. The bill was passed by the Senate on September 11, 1922, but violent opposition to it by the Indians and their friends led to the ultimate defeat of the bill. Be it enacted . . . [Jurisdiction of the District Court of the United States for the District of New Mexico over criminal and civil cases involving the Pueblos] . . . . Sec. 7. That all persons or corporations who, prior to and since the date of the ratification and proclamation of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, July 4, 1848, either in person or through their predecessors, in claim of interest, grantors, privies, or agents, have had actual, open, notorious, exclusive, and continuous possession, under color of title, of, in, or to any lands included within the exterior boundaries of any grant of land confirmed or patented to any of the pueblos hereinbefore named by the United States of America, shall be entitled to a decree in their respective favor for all of the lands so possessed, and the district court shall, by its decree, segregate the said land from the said pueblo grant, and shall ascertain and adjudicate the true boundaries and extent thereof, in the proof of which character of possession and of the boundaries and extent thereof secondary evidence shall be admissible and competent. Upon the entry of any decree segregating any of the lands of any pueblo grant pursuant to the provisions and requirements of this paragraph, the clerk of the said court shall forthwith send to the Secretary of the Interior of the United States a certi- fied copy of said decree, and the said tract of land so segregated having been surveyed by or under his direction, according to the boundaries and extent as set forth in said decree , said Secretary of the Interior shall cause patent therefor to be issued to said person, his heirs or assigns, or to such corporation or its successors in interest. In all cases arising under the provisions of this act wherein the original title and the adverse possession thereunder antedates the dates of ratification and proclamation of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the remedy, relief, and procedure in this paragraph provided shall be exclusive and either party to any suit brought pursuant 217 to the provisions of this act may make proof of date and source of title and the possession thereunder. Sec. 8. That all persons who, or corporations which, for more than 10 years prior to June 20, 1910, either in person or through their respective predecessors in claim of interest , grantors, privies, or agents, have had actual, open, notorious, exclusive and continuous possession, with or without color of title , or any lands falling or included within the exterior boundaries of any grant confirmed or patented to any of the pueblos in this act specified, and all persons who or corporations which in person or through their respective predecessors in claim of interest or grantors claim any such lands lying within the exterior boundaries of any of said pueblo grants under valid grant from...