restricted access 120. Curtis Act, June 28, 1898
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195 Total white persons in the unclassified service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Total white persons . . . . . . . . . . . . 635 Indians in excepted places . . . . . . . . . . 1,356 Indians in positions having salaries below classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Total Indian employees . . . . . . . . . . 1,434 The total of salaries paid to white persons employed at agencies was $546,670; to officials, such as inspectors, special agents, commissioners, etc., not located at agencies, $104,815. Salaries paid to Indians aggregated $258,140, nearly half the amount paid to white employees at agencies. Whenever it has been found practicable to employ Indians it has been the policy of this office to give them the preference, and in the large majority of cases they have been found faithful and earnest, entering heartily into the work of advancing their own people. There are Indian employees at every agency except two; one of these is a very small agency and the other has only two employees. One agency has 107 Indians employed, one has 76, another 72, two have 51, twenty-two have over 20, and nineteen have from 10 to 20 Indians on their employee rolls. Of course a large number are policemen and judges of the courts of Indian offenses, but the number holding other positions is not small, and steadily increases. As stated, none of the above figures refer to employees in schools. Under the orders referred to the entire school service was classified, thus bringing under the operation of civil-service rules 2,070 superintendents , teachers, etc., employed in the various schools, whose aggregate salaries amounted last year to nearly one million dollars. This included 705 Indians, about 34 per cent of the total number of school employees. The statement in detail is as follows: Whites in the classified service: Salary less than $720 . . . . . . . . . 979 Salary $720 or less than $840 . . . . 206 Salary $840 or less than $900 . . . . . 39 Salary $900 or less than $1,000 . . . . 44 Salary $1,000 or less than $1,200 . . 42 Salary $1,200 or less than $1,400 . . 26 Salary $1,400 or less than $1,600 . . 27 Salary $1,800 or less than $2,000 . . 1 1,364 Whites in the unclassified service: Confirmed by Senate . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total white persons . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,365 Indians in excepted places . . . . . . . . . . 705 The salaries paid white school employees amounted to $849,645. Those paid Indians amounted to $148,766. The classes graduating from the various nonreservation schools are fast furnishing material with which to fill school positions of importance and responsibility which require special training as well as aptitude. The first normal class, which was graduated last June, will be referred to hereafter. The recognition of the merit system in the Indian service is a long step forward, and will undoubtedly elevate its standard, improve its morale, and promote its efficiency. The removal of all partisan influence from appointments will give added dignity to the positions and increase the zeal of those engaged in the work. . . . [House Document no. 5, 54th Cong., 2d sess., serial 3489, pp. 3–5.] 120. Curtis Act June 28, 1898 With the Curtis Act, Congress accomplished by legislation what the Dawes Commission has been unable to do by negotiation–effectively destroy the tribal governments in the Indian Territory. This long and detailed act provided for establishment and regulation of townsites, for management of leases of mineral rights, and for other technical matters. Printed here are several key sections, which authorized the Dawes Commission to draw up rolls and allot the lands to Indians on the rolls, prohibited aggrandizement of lands, and abolished the tribal courts. 196 An Act for the protection of the people of the Indian Territory, and for other purposes. . . . . Sec. 11. That when the roll of citizenship of any one of said nations or tribes is fully completed as provided by law, and the survey of the lands of said nation or tribe is also completed, the commission heretofore appointed under Acts of Congress, and known as the “Dawes Commission,” shall proceed to allot the exclusive use and occupancy of the surface of all the lands of said nation or tribe susceptible of allotment among the citizens thereof, as shown by said roll, giving to each, so far as possible, his fair and equal share thereof, considering the nature and fertility of the soil, location, and value of same; but all oil, coal, asphalt, and mineral deposits in the lands of any tribe are reserved to such tribe, and no allotment of such lands...


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