restricted access 119. Extension of Civil Service Rules. September 15, 1896
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194 119. Extension of Civil Service Rules Extract from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs September 15, 1896 In 1896 most employees of the Indian service were placed under civil service rules, leaving only the agents and a few others outside the system. Commissioner Daniel M. Browning reported on the status of the service in his annual report for 1896. . . . . The classified service has been extended over almost every branch of the Indian work. By direction of the President, in accordance with the third clause of section 6 of the civil-service act of January 16, 1883, the Department, March 30, 1896, amended the classification of the employees of the Department of the Interior so as to include therein “all clerks, assistant clerks, issue clerks, property clerks, and other clerical positions and storekeepers at Indian agencies and Indian schools.” Another Department order of same date amended the classification of the Indian service so as to include therein “all physicians, school superintendents, assistant superintendents , supervisors of schools, day school inspectors, school-teachers, assistant teachers , industrial teachers, teachers of industries , disciplinarians, kindergarten teachers, matrons, assistant matrons, farmers, seamstresses and nurses * * * without regard to salary or compensation, all subject to competitive examination for original appointment .” Physicians, superintendents, teachers , and matrons were already in the classified service; but all persons employed in any of the other positions named were on March 30 also brought within its limits. May 6, 1896, the President still further enlarged the scope of the classified service by including therein “all officers and employees , of whatever designation, except persons merely employed as laborers or workmen and persons who have been nominated for confirmation by the Senate, however or for whatever purpose employed, whether compensated by fixed salary or otherwise, who are serving in or are on detail from * * * the Indian service.” Recognizing the disadvantage under which the Indian labors in competing with his more favored white brother, permission was given for the appointment of Indians, without examination or certification by the Civil Service Commission, to all positions except those of superintendent, teacher, teacher of industries, kindergartner, and physician; and for those positions Indians could be selected upon noncompetitive examination, which should consist of such tests of fitness as should be approved by the Department and not disapproved by the Commission. An abstract of all persons in the field in the Indian service June 30, 1896, except school employees, arranged with reference to their relations to the civil-service classification, gives the following items: White persons in the classified service: Agency employees classified by compensation— Salary less than $720 per annum . . . 80 Salary $720 or less than $840 . . . . 164 Salary $840 or less than $900 . . . . . 29 Salary $900 or less than $1,000 . . . 112 Salary $1,000 or less than $1,200 . . 58 Salary $1,200 or less than $1,400 . . 74 Salary $1,400 or less than $1,600 . . 2 Salary $1,600 or less than $1,800 . . 1 Salary $1,800 or less than $2,000 . . 2 Salary $2,000 or less than $2,500 . . 3 Salary $2,500 and over . . . . . . . . . 2 527 Special agents, commissioners, surveying engineers, and physicians to L’Anse Indians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Presidential appointments . . . . . . . . . . 11 Total white persons in the classified service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552 White persons in the unclassified service: Confirmed by the Senate: 38 agents, 5 inspectors, 5 commissioners to Five Civilized Tribes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Military officers acting as agents . . . . 17 Physicians paid for occasional services 3 Transportation agents . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Employed at agencies at compensation below classification . . . . . . . . . . . 12 195 Total white persons in the unclassified service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Total white persons . . . . . . . . . . . . 635 Indians in excepted places . . . . . . . . . . 1,356 Indians in positions having salaries below classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Total Indian employees . . . . . . . . . . 1,434 The total of salaries paid to white persons employed at agencies was $546,670; to officials, such as inspectors, special agents, commissioners, etc., not located at agencies, $104,815. Salaries paid to Indians aggregated $258,140, nearly half the amount paid to white employees at agencies. Whenever it has been found practicable to employ Indians it has been the policy of this office to give them the preference, and in the large majority of cases they have been found faithful and earnest, entering heartily into the work of advancing their own people. There are Indian employees at every agency except two; one of these is a very small agency and the other has only...


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