31. Act for Regulating the Indian Trade, May 6, 1822
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34 and justly due and belonging to the United States; and the said agents, selected for the purpose aforesaid, shall be furnished with copies of the latest quarterly returns of the said superintendent, factors, and sub-factors, as rendered by them to the Treasury Department , and copies of any other papers in the said department which will show what is, or ought to be due and coming to the United States, from the said office of Indian trade in Georgetown, and from each of the tradinghouses established among Indians. . . . Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the goods, wares, and merchandise, which shall be delivered over to the agents of the United States, under the provisions of this act, shall be placed at the disposition of the President of the United States, subject, under his orders , towards satisfying or extinguishing the treaty obligations on the part of the United States, to keep up trading-houses with the Indians ; also, towards the payment of annuities due, or to become due, to Indian tribes; also, in making the customary presents to tribes or individuals in amity with the United States; and the surplus, if any, may be sold to the best advantage, under the orders of the President, and the proceeds paid over to the treasury of the United States. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the furs, peltries, effects and property, received under the first section of this act, shall be sold in the manner the President may direct; the debts due and owing shall be collected under his orders; and all the money received from these sources, and all that shall be received from the superintendent of Indian trade, and from the factors and sub-factors, shall be paid over, as fast as received, into the treasury of the United States: Provided, That such sums may be retained and applied, under the orders of the President of the United States, as may be necessary to defray the expenses of carrying this act into effect. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That, as soon as may be after the commencement of the next session of Congress, the President of the United States shall communicate to Congress the manner in which he shall have caused this act to be executed, showing the amount of moneys, furs, peltries, and other effects, and the amount and description of goods, wares, and merchandise, and the actual cash value thereof, received from the superintendent of Indian trade, and each of the factors and sub-factors, under the provisions of this act. [U.S. Statutes at Large, 3:679–80.] 31. Act for Regulating the Indian Trade May 6, 1822 With the abolition of the government trading houses, the United States fell back on a system of Indian trade carried on only by private individuals and companies. A new law revised the licensing regulations, strengthened the provisions for restricting the liquor trade, set regulations for the distribution of annuities, and created a special superintendent of Indian affairs to reside at Saint Louis. An Act to amend an act, entitled “An act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers,” approved thirtieth March, one thousand eight hundred and two. Be it enacted . . . , That the seventh section of the act, entitled “An act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes and to preserve peace on the frontiers,” shall be, and the same is hereby, repealed; and from and after the passing of this act, it shall be lawful for the superintendents of Indian affairs in the territories and Indian agents, under the direction of the President of the United States, to grant licenses to trade with Indian tribes; which licenses shall be granted to citizens of the United States, and to none others, taking from them bonds with securities in the penal sum not exceeding five thousand dollars, proportioned to the capital employed, and conditioned for the due observance of the laws regulating trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes; and said licenses may be granted for a term not exceeding seven years for the trade with the remote tribes of Indians beyond the Mississippi, and two years for the trade with all the other tribes. And 35 the superintendents and agents shall return to the Secretary of War, within each year, an abstract of all licenses granted, showing by and to whom, when, and where, granted, with the amount of the bonds and...