27. Authorization of Indian Agents., 1818
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30 27. Authorization of Indian Agents 1818 Indian agents, who became the key officials in relations between the United States and the Indian tribes, were not formally authorized in the early decades of the nation’s history but relied for their appointment on vague references in treaties or the trade and intercourse laws. In 1818, however, two measures regularized their status. One provided a method of appointment for agents, along with the superintendent of Indian trade and the agents at the trading houses. The other determined specific compensation for designated agents and for the trading house factors. 1. Manner of Appointing Agents April 16, 1818 An Act directing the manner of appointing Indian Agents. . . . Be it enacted . . . , That the superintendent of Indian trade, the agents and assistant agents of Indian trading houses, and the several agents of Indian affairs, shall be nominated by the President of the United States, and appointed by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That from and after the eighteenth instant, no person shall act in either of the characters aforesaid, who shall not have been thus first nominated and appointed. And every agent as aforesaid, before he shall enter upon the duties of his office, shall give bond to the United States, with two or more sufficient securities, in the penal sum of ten thousand dollars, conditioned faithfully to perform all the duties which are or may be enjoined on them as agents as aforesaid. . . . [U.S. Statutes at Large, 3:428.] 2. Compensation for Indian Agents April 20, 1818 An Act fixing the compensation of Indian agents and factors. Be it enacted . . . , That, from and after the passage of this act, Indian agents and factors shall receive the following salaries per annum, in lieu of their present compensation, to wit; The agent to the Creek nation, one thousand eight hundred dollars. The agent to the Choctaws, one thousand eight hundred dollars. The agent to the Cherokees on Tennessee river, one thousand three hundred dollars. The agent to the Cherokees on the Arkansas river, one thousand five hundred dollars. The agent to the Chickasaws, one thousand three hundred dollars. The agent in the Illinois territory, one thousand three hundred dollars. The agent at Prairie du Chien, one thousand two hundred dollars. The agent at Natchitoches, one thousand two hundred dollars. The agent at Chicago, one thousand three hundred dollars. The agent at Green Bay, one thousand five hundred dollars. The agent at Mackinac, one thousand four hundred dollars. The agent at Vincennes, one thousand two hundred dollars. The agent at Fort Wayne and Piqua, one thousand two hundred dollars. The agent to the Lakes, one thousand three hundred dollars. The agent in the Missouri territory, one thousand two hundred dollars. And all sub-agents, five hundred dollars per annum. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That all factors shall receive one thousand three hundred dollars, and assistant factors seven hundred dollars, per annum. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the sums hereby allowed to Indian agents and factors shall be in full compensation for their services; and that all rations, or other allowances, made to them, shall be deducted from the sums hereby allowed. [U.S. Statutes at Large, 3:461.] ...