20. Superintendent of Indian Trade, April 21, 1806
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23 to take up the hatchet at any time, the seizing the whole country of that tribe, and driving them across the Mississippi, as the only condition of peace, would be an example to others, and a furtherance of our final consolidation . . . . [Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Andrew A. Lipscomb, 10:369–71.] 20. Superintendent of Indian Trade April 21, 1806 This law of 1806 continued the system of government trading houses begun in 1796. It also authorized a superintendent of Indian trade to direct the business. The office of superintendent was held by two men, John Mason (1806–16) and Thomas L. McKenney (1816–22), until it was abolished in 1822. An Act for establishing trading houses with the Indian tribes. Be it enacted . . . , That it shall be lawful for the President of the United States, to establish trading houses at such posts and places on the frontiers, or in the Indian country, on either or both sides of the Mississippi river, as he shall judge most convenient for the purpose of carrying on a liberal trade with the several Indian nations, within the United States, or their territories. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the President of the United States shall be authorized to appoint a superintendent of Indian trade, whose duty it shall be to purchase and take charge of all goods intended for trade with the Indian nations aforesaid, and to transmit the same to such places as he shall be directed by the President. . . . Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the superintendent of Indian trade shall receive an annual salary of two thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly, at the treasury of the United States. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the President of the United States shall be authorized to appoint an agent for each trading house established under the provisions of this act. . . . Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of each of the said agents, to receive from the superintendent of Indian trade, and dispose of, in trade with the Indian nations aforesaid, such goods as may be transmitted to him by the said superintendent ; to be received and disposed of as aforesaid, according to the rules and orders which the President of the United States shall prescribe; and every such agent shall take an oath or affirmation, faithfully to execute the trust committed to him; and that he will not, directly or indirectly, be concerned or interested in any trade, commerce or barter, but on the public account, and he shall render an account quarter yearly to the superintendent of Indian trade, of all money, goods, and other property whatsoever, which shall be transmitted to him, or which shall come into his hands, or for which, in good faith he ought to account; and he shall transmit duplicates of his accounts to the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the superintendent of Indian trade, the agents, their clerks, or other persons employed by them, shall not be, directly or indirectly, concerned in exporting to a foreign country, any peltries or furs belonging to the United States, or interested in carrying on the business of trade or commerce, on their own, or any other then the public account, or take or apply to his or their own use, any emolument or gain for negotiating or transacting any business or trade, during his or their appointment, agency or employment, other than provided by this act, or excepting for or on account of the United States. . . . Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the prices of goods supplied to, and to be paid for, by the Indians, shall be regulated in such manner, that the capital stock, furnished by the United States, shall not be diminished . . . . Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That the sum of two hundred and sixty thousand dollars, including the sums heretofore appropriated , and applied to the like purpose, and 24 exclusive of the salary of the superintendent of Indian trade, and of the allowances to agents and clerks, be, and the same is hereby appropriated, for the purpose of carrying on trade and intercourse with the Indian nations, in the manner aforesaid, to be paid out of any monies in the treasury of the United States, not otherwise appropriated. Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, That if any agent or agents, their clerks...


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