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| 81 7. The Early Migration1 Just above the junction of Hagaθei’la [Little Colorado River] and Hagatai’a [Colorado River] is Hagadjapa’ka, the place where a great many men climbed up from beneath the earth.2 They came out and stayed there. The chief said to Crow [gasok, raven?], “I want you to fly about and look for a good place to raise plenty of corn. When you return and tell us, we will move there.” When Crow came back he said, “There are red cliffs halfway up the Little Colorado; then the canyon opens out a little wider. That is a good place for us.” They all moved to that tolerable place and camped there. They planted a little corn to see if it was promising. Then the corn came up. After a time it had ears, but the ground was not good; it was alkaline and this killed the corn. It did not grow well, the ears were small. The chief said, “We ought to have good ground. I want you to fly about and find another place. Come and tell us; then we will move again.” The people kept traveling up the canyon bed. Crow flew off and returned: “I found a place that seems somewhat good to me.” So the people moved there and tried the land for planting, making fields on both sides of the river. This was at Wiinya’gawaiawaia (a little black mountain just below Black Falls). This place was somewhat good, so they stayed a little longer there. The chief told Crow to go look again for the best land. “Our people are many, so search for a place where they can have big fields. I want you to find it for us.” Crow found such a place, and returning, said, “I found the sort of land you want. It looks very good to me.” Then the old people wanted to move again, but the youngest brother did not want to go. He wanted to go back. So he cried, cried all the time. Theoldestbrothersaid,“Wewantalltogoonwithus.”Theyounger brother said, “No, I do not want to go with you any longer. I want to go 82 | part ii back home. I like the place we left better.” The elder brother said, “All right, we will give you corn. We will give you but a single ear. I will just break those we have in two. I will give you part of the red and white corn (teyadjipa’) and you can have half of the blue ear.” He had two ears of corn. He broke each in two and, giving the halves to the younger brother, he said, “We will also give you our buckskin. We do not want to take any buckskin with us. We have some sheep; they will furnish skins for us.” The younger brother wanted to go back alone, but the older brother told the old woman, their mother, to go back with him. So those two went back together. The older brother said, “Do not eat the pieces of corn I gave you. Save them. Go back home to the north side of the little mountain and plant a little in the open places there where the ground looks good. Test it; do not plant all. This is the place you can call your home, your country. There are plenty of deer there. They are yours, your own animals. Camp there. Then travel about looking for a place with many springs and where the ground looks right. Plant there. To the north of this mountain [Wigatuwi’sa, Red Butte] there are little caves [Kamwidiminyuwa’, old woman’s house?]. When they camped there they tried to plant corn in that ground. There was no water for irrigation. They needed water. So they traveled about to find a spring with which to irrigate, but they could not find any. So they came this way [westward] and found this canyon. They followed down it until they found Havasu’ [Cataract Creek]. They found that the ground on both sides of the stream was pretty good. So they [sic] went back and told their mother, and then all moved down here [Cataract Canyon]. They planted down here. It was very good; so they said, “This is the sort of well-watered place we sought. Things look pretty good to us now.” This place in the canyon was a little narrow. The water was good and there was plenty of good land on...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780826349330
Related ISBN
9780826349316
MARC Record
OCLC
777950993
Pages
336
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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