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Index • 163 163 Index Adagala, Kvetsa, 13–14 Aesop’s fables: animal characters in, 5, 11; attached summary morals, 2–3, 15, 42–46, 48, 53–58, 60–61, 64–65, 97–99; historical overview of, 14, 40–41, 153, 155n2:2; intertextual associations in, 66–67, 73; Kenyan stories compared with, 116–17; storytelling-in-the-schools project examples from, 39, 148–49. See also individual Aesop fables: “The Eagle and the Scarab Beetle,” 1–2; “The Lion and the Dolphin,” 123; “The Wolf and the Lamb,” 148–49; see also other fables: “The Lion and the Man”; “The Lion and the Mouse”; “The Lion’s Share”; “The Wolf and the Crane” aesthetic vs. authentic caring, 8–9 animal characters, 10–11; in Aesop’s fables, 5; calf character, 90–92, 97, 98, 114–15; diffusion of conflict and, 76; direct learning from animals and, 26; gender and, 76; hyena character, 35–36, 100–101, 103–14; importance of small animals , 30, 34, 46–52, 80–81, 85–88, 90–92, 98–99; moral interpretation of stories and, 10–11, 19, 37; multiple viewpoints and, 61–62, 66–71; rabbit character, 33–35, 80, 90–92, 114–15; symbolic meaning in Kenyan stories, 33–34. See also coyote stories; trickster stories Arabian Nights stories, 139 Arthur the Aardvark (television series), 51–52 Ash, Russell, 41–42, 47, 50–51 Ashliman, D. L., 14 Banneker Center, 121, 123–26 biophilia, ix Boulding, Elise, 22 Boys and Girls Clubs, 121, 123, 157n3 Bruchac, Joseph, 127, 140 Bukenya, A., 13–14, 34 bullying, 30, 49–50, 86–88 Cajete, Gregory: on animal characters , 10; on diversity in education , 142; as inspiration for project, 7, 131; on storytelling importance for community, 140; on storytelling in education, 7 Campano, Gerald, 18–19 caring: aesthetic vs. authentic caring , 8; care ethics, 20; caring as education subject, 18; student achievement and, 120. See also interdependence 164 • Index Chamberlain, J. Edward, 15–16 character education, 20–21 childhood: ambiguity and, 120; ethical awareness and, 18, 37; introspection as component of, 21–22; knowledge acquisition and, 17–18; oral tradition and, 16 Coleman, Patricia, 37–38, 61, 65, 117 Coles, Robert, 22 community: communal-oriented cultural framework, 13–14; giving back to the community, 137– 38; as “Great Drought” theme, 83–85, 115; as “Hare and the Sultan” theme, 93–94, 98–99, 115; integrative capacity of stories, xi, 12–13, 17–18; interdependence in, x–xi; “Knowledge in Community ” service-learning course, 120–30; overview of START storytelling, 129–30; solidarity as storytelling effect, 128–29, 140, 142; treatment in mainstream education, 7–8; written vs. oral stories and, 33 conflict resolution, 13 context, xiii, 17, 25–27, 134 Corsaro, William, 17, 71 coyote stories, 13, 28, 30, 134. See also trickster stories Crain, Robert, 18 cross-cultural lessons: collaborative teaching and, 141; diversity of educational practices, 9, 141–42; giving back to the community in, 137–38; in START program, 138–40; storytelling as resource for, 6. See also diversity discourse ethics, 21–23 diversity: animal characters and, 11, 54, 58, 156n8; as education subject , 18, 38; racial identification in story characters, 19; in START program, 138–40; urban school diversity, 55, 156n6:1. See also cross-cultural lessons Dyson, Anne, 18 “The Eagle and the Scarab Beetle,” 1–2 education: benefits of storytelling and, 124–25; care ethics, 20; character education, 20–21; collaborative methods, xiv, 141; diversity of educational practices, 9, 141; historical use of stories in, 4; indigenous teaching use in, xii– xiii; “Knowledge in Community” service-learning course, 120–30; Navajo learning, 136–37; overview of storytelling implications for, xiv–xv, 6; reading/writing in moral education, 120; release of preconceived attitudes, xiv–xv; storytelling as classroom activity, 119; storytelling as literacy tool, 122. See also ethical education Egan, Kieran, 16 empathy, ix, 1–2 Enciso, Patricia, 19 ethical education: overview, 20–21; discourse ethics as learning method, 21–23; diversity as education subject, 18, 38; morals vs. ethics, 155n2:1; multicultural literature as education subject, 18–19; social responsibility in educación, 8. See also education ethical themes: animal characters as interpretive device, 10–11, 19; community theme, 83–85, 93–94, 98–99, 115; empowering-theweak theme, 90–92, 98–99, 115; friendship theme, 102–103, 115; interpersonal context and, 115–16; jealousy theme, 112–14; misuseof -power theme, 41–46, 50–59, 80; morals vs. ethics, 155n2:1; multiple meanings and, 117; personal meaning and...


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