restricted access Image Plates 1
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Nickelodeon front lined with baby carriages, indicating the popularity of films among women (undated). Courtesy of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. <= Undated portrait of filmmaker and star Gene Gauntier. Courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Undated portrait of filmmaker Alice Guy Blaché. Courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Florence Turner in a still from an unidentified film made by Turner Films, Ltd. Courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Celebrating fraternity in an illustration from the Screen Club Souvenir Programme, 1st Annual Ball (April 19, 1913). Comedian John Bunny at center. Courtesy of the New York Public Library, Performing Arts Division. <= Frightened rural wife (Lois Weber) calls her husband at work as an intruder breaks in—a triple-screen effect from Suspense (1913), demonstrating Weber’s filmmaking talents. Photo courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= An intruder peers through a keyhole at his potential victim (Lois Weber) in Weber’s Suspense (1913). Courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Portrait of Lois Weber (c. 1912). Courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= In this still from Lois Weber’s Hypocrites (1915) the figure of “The Naked Truth” holds up her mirror to expose the secret illicit behavior of the suitor while Gabriel looks on. Frame enlargement courtesy of the Library of Congress. <= Still from Ruth Roland, Kalem Girl (1912), demonstrating the future serial heroine’s boxing skills. Photo courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Telegrapher Helen (Helen Holmes) sits at her post in this still from The Hazards of Helen (c. 1915). Photo courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Mabel Normand and Charlie Chaplin in Mabel’s Busy Day (1914). Photo courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= Mabel Normand in a publicity still for Mickey (1918). Photo courtesy of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. <= Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew, producers of genteel comedies (c. 1917). Photo courtesy of the British Film Institute. <= This page intentionally left blank ...


pdf