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201 Contributor Profiles Ruth G. Biró teaches multicultural and children's and young adults' literature at Duquesne University. In her work in Holocaust studies, Biró concentrates on the literature of the Hungarian Holocaust for youth, Raoul Wallenberg's humanitarian role in Budapest, righteous gentiles honored for saving Jewish lives in World War II, and the Holocaust writing of Hungarian emigrée women in the US. Her recent publications include the bilingual Hungarian Picture Dictionary for Young Americans (with Miklós Kontra and Zsófia T. Radnai, 1989) and the article "Representations of Budapest 1944-1945 in Holocaust Literature," Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (Ed. Louise O. Vasvári and Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, 2009). Julianna Horváth Chen received her B.A. in history and anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2006 with a thesis entitled Making Kava Clean: Piper Methysticum in Western Science and Medicine, 1798-1900 and completed her studies in English-Hungarian literary translation at the Balassi Institute in 2008. Her recent translations include Béla Fehér's novel, Alszik a doki Betlehemben as Doc's Asleep in Bethlehem (2007) and Sándor Radnóti's article "Polyphony in Kertész's Kaddish a meg nem született gyermekért (Kaddish for an Unborn Child)," Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (Ed. Louise O. Vasvári and Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, 2009). Marko Čudić is completing his doctorate in Hungarian philology at the University of Belgrade. His fields of interest include contemporary Hungarian literature, comparative aspects of Hungarian literature, and the theory of literary translation. He has published articles on these topics including "Irodalomszemléleti bildungsesszékis érlet" ("Attempt of an Essay on Literary Theory"), Üzenet (2003-04) and "On the Translation of Kertész's Sorstalanság (Fatelessness) into Serbian," Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (Ed. Louise O. Vasvári and Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, 2009), and he has published a book entitled Danilo Kis and Modern Hungarian Poetry (Belgrade, 2007). Čudić has also translated into Serbian books from modern and contemporary Hungarian prose, including works by Dezső Kosztolányi, Péter Hajnóczy, and Ottó Tolnai. 202 Contributor Profiles Esther Faye is a psychoanalyst in private practice and teaches at Victoria University and at the University of Melbourne. Her primary area of research is on the question of the psychic legacies of the Holocaust. Faye's recent publications include "Missing the 'Real' Trace of Trauma: How the Second Generation Remembers the Holocaust," American Imago (2001), "Being Jewish after Auschwitz: Writing Modernity's Shame," Australian Feminist Studies (2003), "Impossible Memories and the History of Trauma," World Memories: Personal Trajectories in Global Time (Ed. Jill Bennett and Rosanne Kennedy, 2003), and "Kertész and the Problem of Guilt in Unfinished Mourning," Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (Ed. Louise O. Vasv ári and Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, 2009). Márta Goldmann teaches English literature at the University of West Hungary. Her publications include "'Sirens.' The Musical Chapter of Ulysses: Technique and Style," Studies on the 20th Century English Novel (Ed. Zoltán Kiszely, 1999), "Crisis in the Writing of University and College Theses in Hungarian Higher Education," Voices (Ed. Zsuzsa N. Tóth, 2004), "Belated Reception: James Joyce's Works in Hungary," Comparative Critical Studies (2006), and she translated, with Peter Hargitai , Magdalena Marsovszky's article "About Antisemitism in Post-1989 Hungary," Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (Ed. Louise O. Vasvári and Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, 2009). Peter Hargitai teaches creative writing and approaches to literature at Florida International University. A poet, novelist, and translator, Hargitai has received numerous awards, such as the Landon Prize of the American Academy of Poets, the Milan Füst Prize, and the Pro Cultura Hungarica Medal. His English-language books include Antal Szerb: The Traveler (1994), Mother Tongue (2002), Attila: A Barbarian's Love Story (2002), Millie (2006), Attila József: Selected Poems (2005), and Daughter of the Revolution (2006), and he translated, with Márta Goldmann, Magdalena Marsovszky's article "About Antisemitism in Post-1989 Hungary," Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (Ed. Louise O. Vasvári and Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, 2009). Nobel Laureate in Literature Imre Kertész was born to a secularized Jewish-Hungarian family, and in 1944 he was deported from Budapest to the concentration camp at Auschwitz, taken from there to Buchenwald, and subsequently to Zeitz, whence he was transferred back to Buchenwald. In 1945 he returned to Budapest and began his career...


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Subject Headings

  • Jews -- Persecutions -- Europe, Central -- History.
  • Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Hungary -- History.
  • Kertész, Imre, 1929- -- Criticism and interpretation.
  • Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Europe, Central -- History.
  • Hungary -- Ethnic relations.
  • Europe, Central -- Ethnic relations.
  • Jews -- Persecutions -- Hungary -- History.
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