Notes
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Notes Notes to Chapter 1 1. Bernice Bowden interviewer, http://memory.loc/gov/mss/mesn/023/ 252251.tif. 2. Zora Neale Hurston, Go Gator and Muddy the Waters: Writings by Zora Neale Hurston from the Federal Writers’ Project (New York: W. W. Norton, 1999). 3. Louise Oliphant, “Work, Play, Food, Clothing, Marriage, etc.,” Compilation Richmond County Ex-Slave Interviews, Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/359355.gif, October 2004. 4. Louise Oliphant, “Mistreatment of Slaves,” Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/295291.gif, October 2004. 5. M. B. Stonestreet, interview of Adeline Willis, vol. 4, part 4, WPA Slave Narrative Project, WPA Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, http:// memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/165161.tif. 6. Louise Oliphant, “Conjuration,” http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/ 044/273269.gif, October 2004. 7. Louise Oliphant, “Folk Remedies and Superstitions,” Compilation Folklore Interviews—Richmond County, Georgia, Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/286282.gif, October 2004. 8. Ibid., http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/289285.gif, October 2004. 9. Ibid., http://memory.loc,gov/mss/mesn/044/288284.gif, October 2004. 10. Ibid.,http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/290286.gif,October2004. 11. Amanda McDaniel, interviewed by Edwin Driskell, WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives, http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/043/ 074071.tif. 12. Bryant Huff, interviewed by Adella S. Dixon, WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives, http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/042/241238 .tif, October 2004. 13. Mr. Leonard, cited in WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives , http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/265261.gif, November 2002. 169 14. WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives, http://memory.loc .gov/mss/mesn/044/267263.gif, November 2002. 15. Mr. Strickland, cited in WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives , http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/266262.gif, November 2002. 16. WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives, http://memory.loc .gov/mss/mesn/044/268264.gif, November 2002. 17. Ibid. 18. WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives, http://memory.loc .gov/mss/mesn/044/271267.gif, November 2002. 19. Ibid. 20. Yvonne P. Chireau, Religion and the African American Conjuring Tradition (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003), 4. 21. Sterling Stuckey, Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 87. 22. Ibid., 91. 23. Ruth Bass, “Mojo” in Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel: Readings in the Interpretation of Afro-American Folklore, edited by Alan Dundes (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1973), 381. 24. WPA Slave Narrative Project, Georgia Narratives, Library of Congress , Manuscript Division, http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mesn/044/266262 .gif, November 2002. 25. Zora Neale Hurston, The Sanctified Church (Berkeley, CA: Turtle Island Press, 1981), 30–40. 26. Eugene D. Genovese, Roll Jordan Roll: The World the Slaves Made (New York: Vintage Books, 1976), 223. 27. Leonora Herron and Alice M. Bacon, “Conjuring and Conjure Doctors ,” in Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel: Readings in the Interpretation of Afro-American Folklore, edited by Alan Dundes (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: PrenticeHall , 1973), 361. 28. Deborah Gray White, Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South (New York: W. W. Norton, 1985), 115–16. 29. Martia Graham Goodson, “Medical-Botanical Contributions of African Slave Women to American Medicine,” in Black Women in American History, edited by Darlene Clark Hine (New York: Carlson Publishing, 1990), 2. 30. Onnie Lee Logan, Motherwit: An Alabama Midwife’s Story (New York: Plume Books, 1991), 63. 31. Arthur Huff Fauset, Black Gods of the Metropolis: Negro Religious Cults of the Urban North, vol. 3, Brinton Memorial Series (Philadelphia Anthropological Society, 1944; reprint University of Pennsylvania Press, 1971), 77–78. Father Divine began his Peace Mission in New York, and Bishop “Daddy” Grace, in Philadelphia and New York in the 1930s. 32. William Bascom, “Folklore,” in International Encyclopedia of the Social 170 Notes to Chapter 1 Sciences (1968), 196–97, cited in Bascom, “Folklore and the Africanist,” Journal of American Folklore, vol. 86, no. 341 (July–September, 1973), 254. 33. Jerrilyn M. McGregory, “There Are Other Ways to Get Happy” AfricanAmerican Urban Folklore (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992), 200. 34 Laura C. Jarmon, Wishbone: Reference and Interpretation in Black Folk Narrative (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2003), 320. 35. See also Loudell F. Snow, “‘I Was Born Just Exactly with the Gift’: An Interview with a Voodoo Practitioner,” Journal of...


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