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>24. Lines Brooks took his typewriter back to his office in late July so he could write in between his frequent meetings and preparations for the fall semester. Every Monday morning, Eveline baked fresh gingerbread and brought a pan over to Camille right after Brooks andThomas left for work. Camille kept the medicine Dr. Steiger prescribed in a pitcher on the top shelf of a kitchen cupboard and went about her daily gardening , cooking, and chasing Andrew around the house. Coral came over one Thursday morning, washed the floors, dusted the furniture, and started squeezing lemons before she told Camille her news.“I don’t think I can work for you after next month.” Camille looked up from the herbal wreath she was making at the kitchen table.“Is it Brooks?” “Oh, no, ma’am.” Coral shook her head.“TheWheatville Bar is going out of business, so Samuel has been looking around and was offered a tending job at Charles Maroney’s saloon on the east side of town.We talked about it for a long time last night, and we decided to move out that way so Samuel can go to school while he works. But he won’t be able to use his boss’s wagon any more, so I don’t see how I could get across town every day.” “I didn’t know Samuel wanted to go to school. Maybe Brooks could . . .” Camille caught the baleful look in Coral’s glance as she measured the sugar. She snipped the ends off a 205 handful of lavender at a slant and worked the stems into her arrangement.“Of course,” she sighed.“Where will he go?” “He’s going to apply to Tillotson College,” Coral answered. “They have a degree for teachers, and he’s always wanted to teach high school history.” “Samuel will make a fine history teacher.” Camille surveyed the dried flowers strewn across the table. Coral set a glass of lemonade and a slice of gingerbread next to her. “I seem to have left my dried Kathryn Morley’s upstairs,” Camille said as she pushed her chair back. “I’ll get them.” Coral started up the stairs. Camille shaped stems of lamb’s ears under the lavender and trimmed shoots of tansy until Coral brought down the delicate pink dried rosebuds. Coral examined the wreath. “It’s beautiful,” she commented.“I like the colors.” “It’s for Eveline,” Camille explained,“to thank her for all the gingerbread.” Coral nodded.“How’s her herb garden coming along?” Camille worked lamb’s ears behind a rosebud. “She said her cuttings died out despite her best efforts, but between you and me,” she lowered her voice,“I don’t think she could tend them without occasionally getting her hands in the soil and her apron smudged, so she gave up.” Coral grinned.“Do you want me to start lunch?” “I don’t think so,” Camille answered. “I’ll make sandwiches when I’m through. But if you would slice and bake the lavender shortbreads, I would be grateful. I want to take them to Jewel’s meeting tonight, and this project is taking longer than I had thought.” Coral found the cookie rolls in the icebox, while Camille worked the Queen Anne’s lace in. “Why did Samuel’s boss decide to close theWheatville Bar?” she asked. “He didn’t,” Coral replied as she lit the stove. “The city 206 Comfort and Mirth passed an ordinance that made it impossible for him to keep it.” “What kind of an ordinance?” Camille asked. “I don’t know exactly. Something about zoning, but Samuel said it’s because it’s so close to Hyde Park. When those homes were sold, they told people it would be a totally white neighborhood. And now that it’s spreading up toward the university, it runs right up next to the bar. I guess the houses in that part are harder to sell because of it.” Camille wiped her hands, sipped her lemonade, and stared out the window.“That doesn’t sound fair.” Coral sliced the cookie dough into thin rounds and spaced them on the cookie sheet.“It isn’t. But after a while, you realize there’s not much you can do about it, so you just go with it.The owner said he was too old to start over, so he’s going to retire a little earlier than he had planned.” Camille sighed and went back to her work.“Well...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780875654782
Print ISBN
9780875653945
MARC Record
OCLC
794701375
Pages
336
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
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