In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

General Index Abraham, Karl, 178, 179, 207; becoming a psychoanalyst, 137; and Carl j ung, 140; death of, 185; distinguished from jung, 143; and Freud's cancer, 176; and Freud as jew, 156; and Freud's separation from jung, 158; and Freud's view ofWW I, 167; his jewishness, 136-37; and Jewish intellectual kinship, 140-41, 142-43; and jewish tenacity, 15, 149; and Moses essay as joke, 165; and self-sacrifice, 150 Academia Espanola Castellana, 58; and Freud and Silberstein, 48 Aggadah, and Isaac Bernays, 75 Ahasverus, and Freud, 234 Akhnaton, 193, 232 Alter, Robert: on melitzah, 27-28 Andreas-Salome, Lou: and Moses and Monotheism, 219-20 Antaeus, 176; and Freud, 152 Antiquities, Freud's collection of 80-81; Antisemitism, 131, 173,241, 253n. 2; Arnold Zweig's study of, 210; and attack on Jakob Freud, 9, 10; and Austria, 210; and Carl Koller, 105; as catalyst for Freud's Jewish identity, 12,20; and Christianity, 117; fear of, 100; against Eastern European Jews, 43; and Freud, 125-26,210; Freud 305 overcoming, 11, 150; Freud's, 43, 4748 ; and Freud's attitude toward Jewish religion,S; Freud's defiance of, 102-4, 130, 225, 242; and Freud's Jewishness, 117,181,188,204; in Germany, 17778 ,224; and Jewish identity, 111; and Jewish jokes, 112; and Jewish character and culture, 217; and construction of Jewish-humanist identity, 224; and Jewish revenge, 130; and Moses, 211; and Moses and Monotheism, 220; and origins ofMoses andMonotheism, 214-15, 231; and psychoanalysis, 150, 156; within psychoanalytic movement, 144; and the Psychological Jew, 220; as reflex of Jewishness, 144; and resistance to psychoanalysis, 139, 143-44, 180; at the University of Vienna, 57, 115-16, 204; and Vienna. 109-10, 133; and Zionism, 203 Apposition, technique of: and Freud, 14042 Arch of Titus, 156, 176 Austria: and rise of Nazism, 210, 214 Autobiographical Study (Selbstdarstellung), 179-80,181; and late period, 4; and "Postscript" to, 180, 222 Avot de Rabbi, Natan: on Moses breaking tablets, 30 306 OVAL ALLEGIANCE Bakan, David, 195; and Heimlichkeit, 194 Balfour Declaration, 168, 196,201 Balfour, Lord, 183, 185 Beller, Steven, 273n. 6; and Judaism, 151 Ben Zoma: on Jewish heroism, 244 Bergmann, Martin: and Freud's intrasystemic change, 19; on Freud and Jewish jokes, 16; and Freud's Rome phobia, 13; and Freud's superego, 165 Berkovits, Dov, 289n. II Berlin, Isaiah: on Freud's opposition to Shabbat candles, 6/' Bernays, Anna Freud: and the "family council," 35; on FH:ud's education, 23; on Jakob's motto, 92 Bernays, Berman (Man:ha's father), 61, 67, 74 Bernays, Eli (Martha's brother), 79 Bernays family: view of Freud, 61 Bernays, Isaac: and creation story, 75-76; on eating and God's law, 74-75; Freud's view of, 78; and humanism, 75-76, 78; as interpreter of Scriptures, 75,76; and Martha's family, 61; and Martha Bernays, 59, 73; as "Nathan's" mentor, 69; and Orthodox Judaism, 75-76, as Orthodox opponent of Reform Judaism, 67; and teaching method, 76, 83; and tension between tradition and modernity, 73 Bernays, Jacob: sat shiv'ah for converted brother, Michael, 73; and scholarship, 74 Bernays, Michael, 170:; converted to Christianity, 73; and humanist scholarship, 73, 75 Bernays, Minna, 12; and allegation of Freud's adultery, 2:76n. 112; and Freud as German, 107 Beyondthe Pleasure Principle: and late period,3 Bible: and Freud, 87-88,122,148,154, 191,196,211; and Freud's education, 34; and Freud's familial education, 29; and Freud's interpretation of, 288n. 297; and Freud's Jewish identity, 12930 , 181,218; and Freud's return to, 242; as instrument of solidarity between Jews, 32-33; and Jakob Freud's Hebrew inscription, 26-32, 27, 28-29; and Jewish democratic attitude, 129; as link between Jakob and Sigmund Freud, 31 Bible, interpretation of: as link between Jakob and Sigmund Freud, 211 Bildung, 143; definition of, 7-8; and Freud,98, 103; and Freud's Jewish identity, 130; and Jakob Freud, 28; and ludentum, 12, 126 Binswanger, Ludwig: attends psychoanalytic circle, 134 Blatt, David, 17 Bliihler, Hans: Secessio ludaica, 177 B'nai B'rith, 3, 173; and antisemitism, 188-89; combining Judaism and humanism, 186; as crucible for dual allegiance" 131; description of, 119; and dream interpretation, 153; and Emancipation, 194-95; and Freud's lectures, 134; and humanism, 12-13, 126; and humanitarian ideals, 188, 190; as humanitarian and Jewish, 191; and humanism through Judaism, 225; Freud's address to...

pdf

Additional Information

ISBN
9781438404813
Related ISBN
9780791418116
MARC Record
OCLC
794701295
Pages
337
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.