restricted access Notes
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Notes Preface 1. "I am Jewish, [therefore] I consider nothing human alien to me." Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi, Freud's Moses: Judaism Terminable and Interminable (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991),97. 2. The conventional English spelling of Wilhelm Marr's coinage, "antiSemitism ," blurs the object of its hatred, for "Semites" could logically refer also to Arabs as well as to Jews. Marr intended to replace JudenhafJ ("Jew-hatred") with a less vulgar and even scientific-sounding word, making Jew-hatred seem more acceptable. The conventional spelling, even contained in Webster's ninth version of the dictionary, contributes to this uncivilized goal. Chapter 1. Introduction 1. Samuel Jaffe, University of Chicago, personal communication. Cf. Harry Trosman, Freud andthe Imaginative World(Hillsdale, N.J.: Analytic Press, 1985), 103. 2. Personal communication. 3. Maryse Choisy, Sigmund Freud: A New Appraisal (New York: Philosophical Library, 1963), 108. 4. Sigmund Freud, Notes upon a Case ofObsessional Neuroses, in The Standard Edition ofthe Complete PsychologicalWorks ofSigmundFreud, 24 vols., ed. and trans. James Strachey (London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis, 1953-74), 10:67-110. Henceforth, "Stnd. Ed." 5. Sigmund Freud, Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-Year-Old Boy, Stnd. Ed., 10:152-204. 6. Sigmund Freud, From the History ofan Infantile Neurosis, Stnd. Ed., 17:3145 . 253 254 DUAL ALLEGIANCE 7. Sigmund Freud, Psycho-Analytic Notes on an Autobiographical Account ofa Case ofParanoia (Schrl'ber), Stnd. Ed., 12:178-307. 8. Sigmund Freud, Autobiography, trans. James Strachey (New York: Norton, 1935),147. 9. Ibid., 148. 10. Ibid., 14~9. 11. Ibid., 149-50. 12. Sigmund Freud, "Obsessive Actions and Religious Practices," Stnd. Ed., 9:115-27. 13. Cf. Earl A. Grollman, Judaism in Sigmund Freud's World (New York: Bloch, 1965). 14. Robert S. Wistrich, The Jews ofVienna in the Age ofFranz Joseph (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989), 539-40. 15. Ibid., 543. 16. In his speech to B'nai B'rith in May 1926; Ernst Freud, ed., Letters of Sigmund Freud, trans. Tania Stern and James Stern (New York: Basic Books, 1960),366--67. Henceforth, Letters. 17. Martin Freud, "Who was Freud?" in Joseph Fraenkel, ed., The Jews of Austria: Essays on thl'ir Life, History, andDestruction (London: Vallentine, Mitchell, and Co., 1967), 202. 18. Martin Freud, Sigmund Freud: Man and Father (New York: Vanguard, 1958), 11. Martin reports that Aunt Dolphi once took Amalia, over ninety at the time, to buy a new hat. "Studying carefully her image crowned by the hat she had agreed to tryon, Amalia ... finally shouted, 'I won't take this one; it makes me look old'" (ibid.). 19. Cf. Freud's words about Goethe, one of his heroes: "He who has been the undisputed darling of his mother [as Freud was] retains throughout life that victorious feeling, that confidence in ultimate success, which not seldom brings actual success with it" (S. Freud, "A Childhood Recollection from Dichtung und Wahrheit" (1917), in S. Freud, Character and Culture, ed. P. Rieff [New York: Collier Books, 1963], 201). 20. Monica McGoldrick and Randy Gerson, Genograms in Family Assessment (New York: Norton, 1985),22. 21. Michael Molnar, ed. and trans., The Diary ofSigmundFreud, 1929-1939. A Record of the Final Decade, the Freud Museum, London (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992), 278n. Henceforth, Diary. 22. Franz Kobler, "Die Mutter Sigmund Freuds," Bulletin des Leo Baeck Instituts 5 (1962): 152. 23. Martin Freud, Sigmund Freud: Man andFather, 11. 24. Peter Gay, Freud: A Lifefor Our Time (New York: Norton, 1988),6. 25. Emanuel Rice, Freud and Moses: The Long Journey Home (New York: SUNY Press, 1990), 57. 26. Ibid., 65. 27. Paul Mendes-Flohr, "History and Kultur: The German-Jewish Perspective ," in A Land of Two Rivers. The German-Jewish Vision of a New Babylon. Forthcoming from Yale University Press. Notes 255 28. Ibid. 29. Ibid. 30. Ibid. 31. Cf. George L. Mosse, Gennan Jews BeyondJudaism (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985), 3-5; and Mendes-Flohr, A LandofTwo Rivers, chap. 1. 32. Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation ofDreams, trans. James Strachey (New York: Avon, 1965),225-26. 33. Ibid. 34. Cited in John E. Gedo and Ernest Wolf, "The 'Ich.' Letter," Psychological Issues 9, nos. 2-3 (1976): 75. 35. Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams, 230; cf. Ernst Simon, "Sigmund Freud, the Jew," Leo Boeck Institute ofJewsfrom Gennany Yearbook 2 (1957): 271. 36. Ibid. 37. Martin Freud, "Who was Freud?"201. 38. Gay, Freud: A Life, 595. 39. Wistrich, The Jews ofVienna, 558 n. 86. 40. Freud, The Interpretation ofDreams...