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Appendix: Errata The Song of the Indian Wars published in the 1971 Bison Book edition of Twilight of the Sioux introduced several line changes made at the author’s request. Until 1971 the lines had been consistent since the first publication of The Song of the Indian Wars in 1925. The Fiftieth Anniversary Edition of A Cycle of the West retains the original versions. The 1971 changes are in lines in section 8, “The Yellow God”; section 11, “The Seventh Marches”; and section 12, “High Noon on the Little Horn”: “The Yellow God” (stanza 3, line 12) Cycle version, p. 356: How Yellow Hair, the Wolf of Washita 1971 version, p. 105: How Long Hair, still the Wolf of Washita “The Yellow God” (stanza 5, lines 1–3 and 6) Cycle version, p. 357: Then once again the name of Yellow Hair Was heard with dread; for Summer, turning brown Beheld him lead a thousand horsemen down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . And deer and singing streams to Frenchman Creek; 1971 version, pp. 106–7: Then once again the Wolf with yellow hair Was on the prowl; for Summer turning brown, Beheld him lead his men and wagons down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . And singing streams and pines to French’s Creek “The Seventh Marches” (stanza 6, lines 14–16, and stanza 7) Cycle version, p. 379: When through the Chetish Hills by many a pass They crowded down upon the Greasy Grass To swell the hostile thousands waiting there. Alas, how wide they made for Yellow Hair That highway leading to the shining Past! 1971 version, p. 131: Among the Chetish Hills that saw them pass Triumphant down upon the Greasy Grass To swell a league-long village. What a road Their myriad ponies made to that abode. Where lives the Tallest of the Shining Past! “High Noon on the Little Horn” (stanza 9, lines 12–16) Cycle version, p. 386: Beneath the iron feet that followed there; For now they deemed the far-famed Yellow Hair, The Wolf of Washita, with all his pack Potential in the dust cloud at his back Bore down upon them. 598 appendix 1971 version, p. 141: Beneath those hoofs; for now it seemed they saw The yellow-headed Wolf of Washita Already on their heels, with all his pack Potential in the dust cloud at his back, A howling fury! Also in The Song of the Indian Wars, the author used two spellings of tepee, sometimes spelling it tepee and sometimes teepee. Because there is a clear preference for tepee, the text has been emended to this spelling throughout. 599 Errata ...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781496207388
Related ISBN
9781496206374
MARC Record
OCLC
1039702821
Pages
726
Launched on MUSE
2018-06-13
Language
English
Open Access
No
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