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173 NOTES NOTE ON SOURCES 1. Susan Coultrap-McQuin, Doing Literary Business: American Women Writers in the Nineteenth Century (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990), 30. INTRODUCTION 1. Hugh Blair, “Lecture II: Taste,” in The Rhetoric of Blair, Campbell, and Whately, ed. James L. Golden and Edward P. J. Corbett (1968; repr., Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1990), 37. 2. Roxanne Mountford, “On Gender and Rhetorical Space,” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 31, no. 1 (2001). 3. Cheryl Glenn, “Mapping the Silences, or Remapping Rhetorical Territory,” in Rhetoric Retold: Regendering the Tradition from Antiquity through the Renaissance (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997), 2. 4. See also Nan Johnson, Gender and Rhetorical Space in American Life, 1866–1910 (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2002); Carol Mattingly, Well-Tempered Women: Nineteenth-Century Temperance Rhetoric (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1998), and Appropriat[ing] Dress: Women’s Rhetorical Style in NineteenthCentury America (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2002); Jane Donawerth, Conversational Rhetoric: The Rise and Fall of a Women’s Tradition, 1600–1900 (Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, 2011); Shirley Wilson Logan, Liberating Language : Sites of Rhetorical Education in Nineteenth-Century Black America (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2008), and We Are Coming: The Persuasive Discourse of Nineteenth-Century Black Women (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1999); 174 NOTES TO PAGES 3–8 Lindal Buchanan, Regendering Delivery: The Fifth Canon and Antebellum Women Rhetors (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2005); and Lisa Shaver, Beyond the Pulpit: Women’s Rhetorical Roles in the Antebellum Religious Press (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012). 5. Mattingly, Well-Tempered Women, 8. 6. Carol Mattingly, “Telling Evidence: Rethinking What Counts in Rhetoric,” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 32, no. 1 (2002): 102–3. 7. Charlotte Hogg, “Including Conservative Women’s Rhetorics in an ‘Ethics of Hope and Care,’” Rhetoric Review 34, no. 4 (2015): 397. 8.Aristotle,On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse,trans.George A.Kennedy,2nd ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007), 37. 9. Mountford, “On Gender and Rhetorical Space,” 41–42. 10. Mountford, “On Gender and Rhetorical Space,” 42. 11. Janet Theophano, Eat My Words: Reading Women’s Lives through the Cookbooks They Wrote (New York: Palgrave,2002),3.A collection of essays edited by Timothy Morton provides a thorough discussion of the variety of forms “good taste” can take. See Timothy Morton, ed., Cultures of Taste/Theories of Appetite: Eating Romanticism (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). 12.Denise Gigante,Taste: A Literary History (New Haven: Yale University Press,2005), 48. 13.Pierre Bourdieu,Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste,trans.Richard Nice (New York: Routledge, 1984), 16. 14. Lori Merish, Sentimental Materialism: Gender, Commodity Culture, and NineteenthCentury American Literature (Durham: Duke University Press, 2000), 30. 15. Robert J. Connors, Lisa S. Ede, and Andrea A. Lunsford, eds., Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press,1984),2–5. 16. Sharon Crowley, Composition in the University: Historical and Polemical Essays (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1998), 34. 17. Nan Johnson, Nineteenth-Century Rhetoric in North America (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1991), 12–13. 18. James L. Golden and Edward P. J. Corbett, eds., The Rhetoric of Blair, Campbell, and Whately (1968; repr., Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1990), 9. 19. Carolyn Korsmeyer, Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999), 1. 20. Korsmeyer, Making Sense of Taste, 6. 21. Dabney Townsend, Hume’s Aesthetic Theory: Taste and Sentiment (London: Routledge , 2001), 49. 22. David Hume, Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. Eugene F. Miller (Indianapolis : LibertyClassics, 1987), 271. 23. Alexander Broadie, ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 284. 24. Hume, Essays, 202. 25. Broadie, Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment, 137–38. 26. Broadie, Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment, 145. 27. Townsend, Hume’s Aesthetic Theory, 139. 28. Annette C. Baier, A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume’s Treatise (Cambridge : Harvard University Press, 1991), 188. 29. Broadie, Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment, 138. NOTES TO PAGES 8–10 175 30. Annette C. Baier, “Hume, the Women’s Moral Theorist,” in Women and Moral Theory , ed. Eva Feder Kittay and Diana T. Meyers (Totowa: Rowman and Littlefield, 1987). 31.Annette C.Baier,“Hume: The Reflective Women’s Epistemologist?,”in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume, ed. Anne Jaap Jacobson (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000), 19. 32. Genevieve Lloyd, “Hume on the Passion for Truth,” in Feminist Interpretations of David Hume,ed.Anne...

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