restricted access 78. Remarks Made While Reporting to Qiao Shi
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442 78 Remarks Made While Reporting to Qiao Shi1 February 26, 1990 On the question of stability—which is the big picture—I ask you to assure the Party Central Committee that we are determined to keep Shanghai stable, and we can keep it stable. Politically, we think that the current situation in Shanghai is good. There are some elements of instability, but it can be kept stable. The three months of March, April, and May will be key. If we can keep Shanghai stable during these three months and if there are no major incidents, then nothing will happen this year, and there will also be no major incidents in the future. We are preparing to convene a plenary session of the Municipal Party Committee as soon as the Sixth Plenary Session of the 13th Central Committee concludes , in order to put its spirit into practice. We will start acting immediately, and the first priority will be the various schools. The secretary, deputy secretaries , and Standing Committee members of the Municipal Party Committee and our vice mayors will spread out in over 10 directions to do ideological work at schools—that’s what we did in 1988. I believe that we can keep things stable politically. We handle many things cautiously, and, in particular, we are asking retired veterans to act as our gatekeepers, to deal with things strictly yet cautiously , so that we can keep the situation in Shanghai stable. I agree with [Wang] Daohan’s2 view that the economy won’t be too good. That’s the situation all over the country, and I’m not too optimistic. I can’t say that the markets will turn around if we work on them for the remaining half of this year—I’m afraid it will take longer. It now appears that these measures to start up the economy won’t be enough to turn this situation around. We must be sufficiently prepared mentally; that is to say, things won’t become too good all at once. The conditions in Shanghai are very good: our coal inventory has gone from a three-day supply in the past to the current one-month and more, 1. Zhu Rongji made these remarks during the presentation of a report by the Shanghai Municipal Party Committee to Qiao Shi, then a member of the Politburo Standing Committee and secretary of the Central Discipline Commission, who was on an inspection tour of Shanghai. 2. See chapter 11, note 2. Zhu_Shanghai Years_1987-1991_hc_9780815731399_i-xii_1-620.indd 442 12/26/17 12:01 PM Remarks Made While Reporting to Qiao Shi 443 and the conditions for production are much better than they used to be. Provided we have the markets, Shanghai will be able to produce at full speed and raise our growth rate to over 10%—this is no boast. The problem is that given the situation around the country, Shanghai can’t turn itself around all at once. With 40% of our products being sold across the country, if we can’t get our money back, if it’s just locked up there, how can it circulate? However, things can only get so bad. We can still keep things stable, the economy can still maintain a certain growth, and market prices can be kept stable. Work stoppages or laid-off workers aren’t a major problem in Shanghai, either. We mainly have to work on industrial restructuring and not be afraid to shut [enterprises] down. We are sufficiently prepared mentally, so this isn’t a serious problem. Social order in Shanghai is still quite good, and most crimes are committed by transients. We can assure the Central Committee that we are determined to keep Shanghai stable. We have some measures [in place], we have the confidence and the determination—the Central Committee need not worry. Another question to discuss is one that [Chen] Guodong3 and [Hu] Lijiao4 raised the last time we were reporting to [Vice President] Yang Shangkun: which direction should Shanghai take? They were asking about the further opening up of Shanghai. To tell you the truth, as the municipal Party secretary, I didn’t dare raise this subject. I said that I’ll do whatever the Central Committee tells me to do—that’s all I’m thinking about now. If I can keep things stable, if I can maintain the status quo, I’ll feel that I’ve done quite decently. Later, when Guodong raised this question, it attracted...


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Subject Headings

  • Shanghai (China) -- Social policy.
  • Shanghai (China) -- Economic conditions -- 20th century.
  • Shanghai (China) -- Economic policy.
  • Zhu, Rongji, 1928-.
  • City planning -- China -- Shanghai.
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