restricted access 72. Shanghai's Hopes Lie in the Development of Pudong
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399 72 Shanghai’s Hopes Lie in the Development of Pudong1 October 26, 1989 Why are we proposing to speed up the development of Pudong? It is because Shanghai is in need of renewal and development. Its main problems are overcrowding, serious obstacles to transportation, excessive concentration of industries, and rather serious pollution. Since Pudong is in fact an extension of the old urban center, it offers the best, the most outstanding conditions for development. The costs will primarily be for infrastructure construction and river-crossing projects. Other costs will be much lower than if we were to develop toward the east or west, toward the north or south. Moreover, we would be able to make great use of the commerce in the original old urban area. Pudong is also an ideal area for easing crowding and dispersing population and industries from the old urban center. From a long-term perspective, Shanghai must be oriented toward the Pacific Ocean, toward the whole world. We want to build it into a modern city, into the largest economic and trade center on the Pacific coast, so of course we also must develop Pudong. It has a port, it is by the sea, and has a superb geographic location, which is why we are now proposing to speed up its development. The first and most important step in this direction is infrastructure construction . If we don’t build infrastructure, developing Pudong is just an empty phrase. Here the first priority is the port. Building a port can drive Pudong’s development—after all, cities flourish along with their ports. That’s why construction of Pudong’s port must be given first priority. As a result, the Ministry of Transportation has approved construction of the Waigaoqiao port as the first thing for Shanghai under the Eighth Five-Year Plan. I consider this the greatest support for the development of Shanghai. All of you from the departments concerned should take priority construction of the Waigaoqiao port to be your most important task, and there can be no wavering whatsoever on this point. The second [priority] in infrastructure construction is roads. We should attach the utmost importance to building the ring road and do this in conjunction with the rebuilding of the old city, which lies within the 76.5 square 1. Zhu Rongji delivered this speech at a meeting on the development of Pudong. Zhu_Shanghai Years_1987-1991_hc_9780815731399_i-xii_1-620.indd 399 12/26/17 12:01 PM 400 Shanghai’s Hopes Lie in the Development of Pudong kilometers of Puxi. If this ring road doesn’t reach Pudong, the latter’s development can’t take place. That’s why as part of the master plan the ring road must go to Pudong. In the future, this area [within the ring road] will constitute the entire downtown; Lujiazui in Pudong is in fact an extension of the old urban center, and they’ll all be part of downtown eventually. We have to make every effort to start building the ring road next year, no matter what. We can learn from the method Li Ruihuan used in Tianjin and mobilize the entire city— those with money contributed money, those with energy contributed energy. This isn’t just about developing Pudong. Once we have a ring road, traffic congestion within the urban area will be greatly alleviated. This is the reason why we’re far behind Beijing and Tianjin. It is why we must concentrate our forces and do this planning well. How many years will it take to complete this ring road? How should we set the standards for it? These activities must be properly planned—this is of the utmost importance. I’ll be very satisfied if this road can be built during my term in office, because this will be doing a great thing for Shanghai. Once the Huangpu River Bridge2 is open to traffic, it will greatly benefit Pudong’s development. If we also consider putting the river-crossing project at Ningguo Road3 [into the plan], then when it’s open to traffic, I think the pace of Pudong’s development will be very rapid. Crossing the river won’t be difficult, and once public transportation is in place, living in Pudong will be the same as living in the urban area, and many people will be willing to move there. Of course the outer ring road can’t be completed in 5 years and there’s even some question as to whether it...


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Subject Headings

  • Shanghai (China) -- Social policy.
  • Shanghai (China) -- Economic conditions -- 20th century.
  • Shanghai (China) -- Economic policy.
  • Zhu, Rongji, 1928-.
  • City planning -- China -- Shanghai.
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