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From: Race News

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Index Abbott, Robert: death of, 78; establishing ChicagoDefender, 27–30; on racial violence, 33, 35, 43; on state surveillance during World War I, 36–37 Abernathy, Ralph, 146, 188 activist journalism, 200–202 advertising, 20–22, 77, 120, 132–33 alternative black press: during anticommunism in 1950s, 127–28; of Black Power Movement 155–63, 177–78; definition of, 5–6; of New Negro Movement, 41–50 American Newspaper Guild, 80–81 American Society of Newspaper Editors, 191, 204, 205–6 anticommunism, 117–18, 121–32 ArkansasStatePress, 149–50 Artis, William, 197 Asian-African Conference, 141–43 Associated Negro Press, 82, 101, 108, 166 Associated Press, 68, 146, 192, 201, 205 AtlantaDailyWorld: becoming a daily, 79; coverage of school desegregation, 141; and coverage of sit-in movement, 157–58 AtlantaInquirer, 158 Audit Bureau of Circulations, 77 Badger, John Robert, 73–74, 124, 127, 159 Baldwin, James, 174, 184–85 BaltimoreAfro-American: business contraction, 132, 166, 211; business expansion, 30, 61, 76–77, 81, 119; on communism, 70, 75; coverage of Spanish Civil War, 86–88; sensationalism in, 59; and World War II correspondents, 108 Bandung Conference, 141–43 Baraka, Amiri, 176 Barnett, Claude: on communism, 117–18; on coverage of Africa, 135; on newsroom integration, 136; on PittsburghCourier circulation, 64 Bass, Charlotta: and anticommunism, 125–26; CaliforniaEagle’srising popularity, 61–62; taking over Eagle, 31–32 Bates, Daisy, 149–50 Bates, L. C. SeeBates, Daisy Bibb, Joseph, 62, 70 Black Arts Movement, 176 Black Citizens for a Fair Media, 202 BlackDispatch (Oklahoma City), 31, 173 BlackJournal, 202 BlackLiberator, 177–78 260  •  Index BlackPanther. See Black Panther Party Black Panther Party: BlackPanther, 5, 170–72; and commercial black publishers, 172–73; Earl Caldwell’s reporting on, 197–99; FBI surveillance of, 175–76; on William Raspberry, 193–94 Black Power Movement, 152–54, 162–63, 168–78 black press: definition of, 4–5; foreign correspondence, 84; industry contraction, 132–33, 150–51, 163–66, 211; industry expansion, 20–23, 76–79, 81–82, 119–21; journalists’ expanding editorial influence, 79–81; nineteenthcentury editors, 16–19 black print culture, 3–4, 41–42, 151, 208–9 BlackWorld. SeeNegroDigest Bolden, Frank, 106, 111 Bond, Julian, 158, 188 Booker, Simeon, 139, 144, 182 Bouldin, G. W., 37 boycotts. Seeeconomic boycotts Briggs, Cyril, 47–48, 50–51 Brooks, Deton, 110, 113–14, 123 Brown, H. Rap, 152–53 Brown, Mildred, 173 Brown, Tony, 201, 202 Brown, Warren H., 103–4 Brownv.BoardofEducation, 140–41 Bruce, John Edward, 49, 53 BurningSpear, 178 Burns, Ben, 71, 73–74, 124, 135 Caldwell, Earl, 197–99 CaliforniaEagle: competition with Los AngelesSentinel, 78; founding of, 31–32; growing popularity, 61–62; selling of, 125–26 Calvin, Floyd, 51 Carmichael, Stokely, 168, 187, 188 Cartwright, Marguerite, 142–43 Catledge, Turner, 136–37 ChicagoBee, 62, 99 ChicagoBroadAx, 28, 52 ChicagoDefender: business operations, 76–77, 133, 147–48, 211; coverage of Joe Louis-Primo Carnera fight, 63–64; coverage of Marcus Garvey, 52; coverage of Second Italo-Ethiopian War, 85; as cultural front, 69, 75; early mass appeal of, 27–30; reportage during World War II, 89–91, 108 ChicagoWhip, 52, 62, 70 circulation, 81–82, 119, 132, 211 Civil Rights Act of 1964, 163 Civil Rights Movement: of Brown v. Board ofEducation, 140–41; coverage of assassination of Malcolm X, 166–68; defining Black Power, 168–69; of Little Rock Crisis, 148–50; of Montgomery Bus Boycott, 145–47; of murder of Emmett Till, 144–45; of sit-in movement, 156–58 Clarke, John Henrik, 159 Cleaver, Eldridge, 168, 171 ClevelandCallandPost, 78, 82, 132, 139 ClevelandGazette, 18, 78 Cold War. Seeanticommunism communism, 68–76 Communist Party (USA). See communism Congressional Black Caucus, 200 Cooke, Marvel, 1–2, 74, 123 Cooper Jackson, Esther, 158–59 Counterintelligence Program (COINTELPRO). SeeFBI Crisis. SeeDu Bois, W. E. B. Crusader(edited by Cyril Briggs), 48, 50–51 Crusader(edited by Robert Williams), 155–56 cultural fronts. Seecommunism Dabney, Virginius, 8, 102–3 Davis, Frank Marshall: on ChicagoBeeand ChicagoWhip, 62; and his progressive outlook, 70, 117–18, 123 Davis, John P., 120 Delaney, Paul, 194, 205 digital media, 210, 211–12 Double V campaign, 105–7 Douglas, Emory, 171 Du Bois, W. E. B.: and anticommunism, 126, 127, 130; on black press, 77, 126; “Close Ranks” editorial, 37–38, 46; on Index  • 261 coverage of Africa, 134–35; editor of Crisis, 23–27; on Harlem Renaissance, 56; on Marcus Garvey, 52; on outbreak of World War II, 93–94 Dunjee, John, 173 Dunjee, Roscoe, 31 Ebony: criticism of...


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