Index

From: Muslim Cool

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263 Index 415 (emcee), 85, 88, 90 Abdullah, Zain, 167, 243n14 Abdur-Rashid, Imam Al Hajj Talib, 93–95, 182–84 Africa, devalued as locus of Islamic authenticity , 96–97, 226 Afrika Bambaataa, 46, 55–56, 57, 189–90 Afrika Islam, 46–47, 57 Afro-Arab solidarity, 72–73, 228 Afro-Asian solidarity, 73, 228 Afrocentricity: in hip hop, 51–52, 56, 72, 121–22; in the ’hoodjab, 71, 130; and Islam, 53; as social movement, 71, 72, 135 Agamben, Giorgio, 220–21 Ahmadiyya Muslim community, 48 Aidi, Hisham, 201, 216, 217 Ali, Duse Muhammad, 237n18 Ali, Muhammad, 57, 142 Alim, H. Samy, 29 Alsarah, 210 Alsultany, Evelyn, 239n3 America/Islam binary, 8, 24, 136–37 American Islam, 195 American Muslims (State Department), 178–79, 194, 195, 216, 217 Americanness: as identity, 145, 169; as source of authority, 145, 170–71, 224 anthropology of Islam, 8, 74–75 anti-Americanism, zoot suits as markers of, 171 anti-Blackness: in Muslim world, 97; by non-Black U.K. Muslims, 208; by non-Black U.S. Muslims, 14–15, 41–42, 45, 67–68, 84, 101, 126–27, 222–23, 224, 226; racial logics of, 14–15; as structural condition, 45, 83, 220. See also blackness : repudiation of, as un-Islamic antiracism, official, 82, 92 appropriation: of Black culture by nonBlacks , 1–2, 3–4, 72, 119, 134–35, 225–26, 227; of White clothing styles by Blacks, 153–54, 165, 171 Arabic, as source of status, 21, 42 Arab U.S. American Muslims: anti-Black racism among, 14–15, 43, 126–27; as “immigrants,” 12, 15, 84; perceived as non-White, 42; privileged authority of, 12–13, 83–84, 94–95, 100 Architect, 88–89 Armstrong, Louis, 215 Asian U.S. Americans, 73, 132, 169 Babikar, Shaykh, 203 Baraka, Amiri, 186 beards: as identity marker, 24, 166, 200; as source of status, 42, 45 Beatnick, 73 Berry, Chuck, 189–90 Big Daddy Kane, 53, 154–55 Billson, Janet Mancini, 141 bint, 148 Black, Aja, 210 Black Arts Movement, 56, 183, 185, 186, 191–92, 194 Black bodies, objectification of, 102–4, 105–106, 107, 225–26 264 | Index Black cool, 57, 82, 106, 131, 138, 139–43 Black consciousness, 44, 50, 52–53, 55, 56, 57, 185 Black criminality, trope of, 14, 81, 173, 223, 224, 240n10 Black dandyism, 143, 147, 148–49, 164, 168, 170, 173. See also Muslim dandyism Black dress, as site of domination and resistance, 152–54, 164–65, 167, 168, 171–72, 222–23 Black expressive cultures: devalued by ethnoreligious hegemonies, 3, 80, 84, 93, 94–95, 100–101, 224; appropriation of, 3–4, 119, 134–35, 225–26 Black Islam: as Black vernacular culture, 49–51, 57; definition of, 48–49; dietary prescriptions in, 69–70; perceived illegitimacy of, 48, 62–63, 80; as source for hip hop, 28, 29–30, 46–48, 50, 53– 57, 69, 122; as source for Muslimness, 30, 63, 71, 73–74, 122, 135, 221 Black Lives Matter, 219–20, 229–31 Blackman, Toni, 180 Black men: as icons, 105–6, 154; precariousness of lives of, 140–42, 152, 219–20, 222; as protectors of the nation, 172; as thugs, 118, 152, 173, 223, 224 Black masculinity: crisis of, 141–42, 151, 173; and dress, 148–49, 155–57, 158, 162, 164, 167, 173 Black men: as icons, 105–6, 154; precariousness of lives of, 140–42, 152, 219–20, 222; as protectors of the nation, 172; as thugs, 118, 152, 173, 223, 224 Black Nationalism, 51, 52, 55 Blackness: and class, 147–48, 153, 154, 156; as Diasporic, 5, 6–7; disavowal and instrumentalization of, 79–81, 82–84, 103–108, 185, 224–26; erasure of, in Muslim spaces, 92–93, 127, 178; in Muslims’ self-making, 5, 8, 23–24, 44–45, 72, 75–76, 102, 115, 129–30, 133–35, 137–38, 222, 224–25; policing/ self-policing of, 87, 92–93, 98, 100–101, 106–8, 224, 226; repudiation of, as un-Islamic, 15, 84, 93, 97–98, 100–101, 107–8, 160, 165, 226; and portrayals of sexuality, 14, 150–51, 224; as valued and devalued, 14, 120, 138, 226 Black Panthers, 44, 73 Black popular culture, 7, 115, 119, 123 Black Power Movement, 72, 183, 185–86, 218 Black president, 82–83, 172–73, 219. See also Obama, Barack Black radical tradition: as conduit to Muslim Cool, 44, 72, 228; and IMAN, 185–87, 189–90, 193, 194, 197; as predecessor of hip hop...


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Subject Headings

  • African Americans -- Relations with Muslims.
  • Muslims -- United States -- Social conditions.
  • African American Muslims -- Social conditions.
  • African Americans -- Race identity.
  • Hip-hop -- Social aspects -- United States.
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