Acknowledgments
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} ix Acknowledgments Sincere thanks go to many people in the making of this book: My colleagues at Colorado State University: Ann Gill, dean (2005–­ 2016) of the College of Liberal Arts; Pattie Cowell, Dan Beachy-­ Quick, and Louann Reid in the Department of English; Greg Dickinson, chair of Colorado State’s Communication Studies Department; my graduate students in fall 2012’s e630 “American Transcendentalism”: Matt Bradley, Aaron Carlile, Neil Fitzpatrick, Maurice Irvin, Bryan Johnson, Robert Laurie, Neely O’Connor, Susan Ring de Rosset; and particularly to emeritus English faculty member Ward Swinson, who read multiple versions of the chapters on Charles Ives and Joseph Cornell, and who steadily supported me in this project; the interlibrary loan staff members at Morgan Library, particularly Theresa Spangler; the staff at Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and Gilmore Music Library, Uni‑ versity of Pennsylvania’s Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts, Harvard University’s Houghton Library, Boston University’s How‑ ard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, and Leslie Perrin Wilson at the Concord Free Public Library; Professional colleagues, readers, and encouragers: David Robinson, Phyllis Cole, Anne Phillips, and Greg Eiselein, who encouraged me to pursue the theme of secularization, Garrison Nelson, Jana Argersinger, Monika Elbert, Jayne Gordon, Jonathan Arac, and Walter Biggins and Tom Roche of the University of Georgia Press; Participants in the National Endowment for the Humanities “New England Renaissance” summer institutes for teachers, 1990, 1992, and 1994, and their leaders Carol Anne Hixon and Ed Schamberger (1935–­ 2011); My eagle-­ eyed editor here in Fort Collins, Carrie Lamanna; My loving, patient, and insightful family: Chris Nelson, Margaret Ronda, and James Ronda. Portions of “Elizabeth Peabody and the Fate of Transcendentalism” appeared in Reinventing the Peabody Sisters, edited by Monika M. Elbert, Julie E. Hall, and Katherine Rodier (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006), and are used by permission of University of Iowa Press. Portions of “Annie Dillard and the Fire of God” are reprinted by permission from the May 18, 1983, issue of the Christian Century, © 1983 by the Christian Century . x { Acknowledgments Portions of “Annie Dillard’s Fictions to Live By” are reprinted by permission from the November 14, 1984, issue of the Christian Century, © 1984 by the Christian Century. Portions of “Rethinking Transcendentalism: Perry Miller, Truman Nelson, and Thoreau’s ‘Lost Journal’  ” appeared in Modern Language Quarterly 74, no. 1 (2013): 95–­ 114. Copyright 2013. Duke University Press. All rights reserved. Re‑ published by permission of the present publisher, Duke University Press. www​ .dukeupress​.edu. Portions of “The Concord School of Philosophy and the Legacy of Transcen‑ dentalism” appeared in New England Quarterly 82, no. 4 (December 2009): 575–­ 607, and are used with permission of New England Quarterly. “The Course of a Particular,” from The Palm at the End of the Mind: Selected Poems and a Play, by Wallace Stevens, © 1967, 1969, 1971 by Holly Stevens, is used by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House llc. All rights reserved. Brian Teare’s “Hello (Ives)” previously appeared in Companion Grasses (San Francisco: Omnidawn, 2013) and is reprinted by permission of the author and Omnidawn Publishing. Mary Oliver, “The Lilies Break Open Over the Dark Water,” from the vol‑ ume House of Light by Mary Oliver, published by Beacon Press, Boston, © 1990 by Mary Oliver, is used herewith by permission of the Charlotte Sheedy Literary Agency, Inc. “The Sea,” from American Primitive by Mary Oliver, © 1983 by Mary Oliver, is reprinted by permission of Little, Brown and Company. The Fate of Transcendentalism This page intentionally left blank ...


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