Index
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275 INDEX Note: Page numbers in italics refer to images. Adams, Jan, 111, 133–134, 135 Advisory Committee on Blood and Tissue Safety and Availability, 257–260 Affordable Care Act, 257 AIDS. See HIV/AIDS albumin: development of ability to isolate, 34, 35; heat-treated, 37, 77, 87; uses of, 256 alcohol fractionation, 35, 41 Aledort, Louis: downplaying of AIDS risk, 81, 82–83; resistance to clotting product recalls, 171; as witness for drug companies, 82, 115, 233, 246, 247 Allen, J. Garrott, 37, 46 Alpha Therapeutic Corporation: as defendant in federal class action, 142; and delay in viral inactivation of blood products, 97, 195; Drees on viral inactivation project at, 101; litigation against, in Japan, 130; revolt within class action steering committee and, 199 American Blood Resources Association, 168 American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFAR), 107–108 And the Band Played On (Shilts), 98 antibodies, clotting drugs and, 257 Armour Pharmaceutical Co.: blood collection practices, 160, 169, 188, 256; Canadian investigation of, 241–242, 248–250; and development of blood products, 35; and FDA regulatory failures, 238; and ineffective heat treatment, 65, 169, 187–188, 242, 248; and ineffective heat treatment, alleged efforts to hide, 187–188, 248; litigation against, 7, 65, 76, 90, 109, 112, 142, 180, 187, 238–239, 240–241; safety-cost calculations by, 188; sales of contaminated clotting products, 188; settlement, motives for, 159; settlement negotiations, 141, 147, 154, 159–161, 172–173, 200, 217 Aronson, David: deposition of, 227–228; and industry–regulator ties, 194; as NIH/FDA regulator, 55, 91–93; Weinberg’s meeting with, 91–93, 97; as witness for drug companies, 55–56, 115, 233 Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA): AIDS litigation group, 64, 65–66; Weinberg’s presentation to, 133–134 ATLA. See Association of Trial Lawyers of America Australia, hemophilia-AIDS litigation in, 64, 66, 73, 74 Babesia, 259 Bad Blood: A Cautionary Tale (film), 250–251 Barr, Duncan, 81–82, 115, 150, 188–189, 201, 217 Baxter Healthcare Corporation: blood collection practices, 144, 160, 193–194, 196–197; and Factor VIII blood-clotting products, development of, 37; former employees interviewed by Weinberg, 117–121; litigation against, 30, 130, 142; and NHF, efforts to control, 170; and plasma protein market, 256; separation of low bio-burden plasma for research, 194; settlement, motives for, 159; settlement negotiations, 141, 145, 147, 154, 159–161, 172–173, 200; Shanbrom’s career at, 102–104; and viral contamination, possible efforts to downplay risks of, 104; and viral inactivation of blood products, delay in, 191, 193, 194; and Weinberg, accusations of ethics violations against, 141–142. See also Hyland Therapeutics INDEX 276 Bayer Corp.: blood collection practices, 46; as defendant in Johnson case, 30; and New Jersey statute-extension law, 214–215; settlement negotiations, 217. See also Cutter Laboratories Bechhofer, Jack, 88–89 Behringwerke AG clotting factor cleansing method: Cutter’s use of, 126; development of, 54, 77, 83–84, 86; losses in starting material from, 86–87; as prod to Baxter’s research, 193; steps in, 86–87; time of U.S. awareness, as issue, 92; Weinberg’s research on, 64–65, 66, 72, 77, 83–84, 86–89 Behringwerke AG, letter from Heimburger, 127 Blood (Starr), 35 blood-clotting products. See Factor VIII blood-clotting products blood donation centers: FDA inspection and, 7, 196; lack of donor screening in, 4–6, 46, 170, 186, 197, 204; violations of FDA regulations in, 196–197 blood donors: for Canadian fractionators, 186; citizens of impoverished nations as, 6–7, 46, 168–169, 173, 174–175, 188, 193, 196, 256; and compromising of safety for cost effectiveness, 174, 175; gay men as, 7, 173–174, 174, 246, 260–261; by hepatitis-infected donors, 7, 173–174, 174, 197, 237, 246; high-risk, as ongoing issue, 253–255; high-risk, industry awareness of, 227, 230–231; high-risk, product users’ lack of knowledge about, 171; industry blocking of stricter standards for, 255; introduction of screening for, 82; lack of notification for infected donors, 237; low-income, risks associated with, 6–7, 104, 173, 193, 253–254, 254–255; relaxation of restrictions on, 260–261; screening of, as inadequate, 4–6, 46, 170, 186, 197, 204; Shanbrom’s early concerns about, 104; violations of federal regulations in, 246. See also specific companies blood donors, paid: efforts to eliminate, 38–39, 42, 46, 254, 255; Hyland’s turn to, 119; risks associated with, 6–7, 119; warnings about consequences of, 37, 46, 168–169; Weinberg...


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