One by One Bright Gifts from Heaven: 1883
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98 r The Jacobses board two successive families during the spring, but Harriet is sick and Lulu assumes most of the housekeeping burden, becoming thin and ill herself. Building on her experience at Willowbrook, Lulu decides to start her own jam and preserves business in Washington. Lulu continues to offer words of encouragement to Genie, who is completely run down with hard work and an ongoing dental infection. Lulu believes that the Camden air is malarial and ruining the Webb family’s health. By the end of the summer, life has improved for everyone. Genie and her family have returned from the countryside restored, and both she and her sister received promotions in their school. Lulu’s shelves are fully stocked with jellies and pickles, and the orders are coming in. She rents a large house in the fall to take in boarders, and in December she lands a teaching job at Howard University, where she and her mother are given comfortable rooms. [From Louisa. Written along the side: “Sallie is not going to have a wedding, which at least shows some taste under the circumstances.”] Lafayette Square Washington Jan. 3, 1883 Darling Genie Your lovely Christmas card was duly appreciated and admired. Thanks my dear childie. I did not mean to pass you by on that occasion Genie. I even got your card (which you shall have some time). Shall I tell you why I did not send it? I felt guilty to remember you and not my dead friends children. Nay, I did not forget them. I have been so worried and perplexed as to lose all heart for the holidays. You know dear how I told you we were on the lookout for a One by One Bright Gifts from Heaven 1883 One by One Bright Gifts from Heaven: 1883 99 furnished house. After much trouble we obtained one with the understanding that the family who are to board with us this winter would be here the first of January. Imagine our trouble after renting the house and paying the first months rent, to learn the family would not be here until Feb. It was a sore disappointment for we had incured so much expense. I hope you got a good deal of pleasure out of the holidays and that the New Year will bring you and yours many blessings. It has been quite gay here in colored society—fashionable weddings and parties. Miss Park and Dr. Shadds was a grand affair.1 No one was admitted to the church except by card. They had the last wrinkle of the fashionable world viz three bridesmaids and one groomsman. A little girl preceded procession up the aisle bearing a basket of flowers. I was not present but heard that the march up the aile was most funereal. The dresses were very handsome and ought by right to have trailed through broader aisles. I wonder dear if this mind can take in the solemnity of the occasion altered in so much splendor. I mean outward splendor. I am afraid not from remarks I have heard. Mr. Grimké married them with our form of marriage.2 None other is so beautiful! Just now a fearful scandal is going the rounds of Washington. I am sorry from my heart that it concerns teachers. I will send you a clipping from one of the papers. They tell me it was nothing to what another (Sunday) paper contained . There is no thought so far as I have heard contradicting the guilt of the parties. Two friends of mine who went from here to spend Christmas in Baltimore knew of their arrival in that city on Sunday morning. The names of the two other teachers have not been made known, but the world with its usual charity has whispered them. Do you know Sallie Chew3 is to be married on the 16 of this month? This is in confidence, say nothing about it. Poor girl! I hope she may be happy. Give love to the sisters. I would kiss them if I could. God, dear love be with thee. Thine Lulu [Enclosed in the letter is the following newspaper article.4 ] A Scandal in Colored Society. Charges involving a prominent colored church leader and a colored teacher. A scandal, which is expected will soon receive some attention from the board of public school trustees, has obtained very wide circulation among the colored citizens 100 One by One Bright Gifts from Heaven: 1883 of the...


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Subject Headings

  • Jacobs, Louisa Matilda, 1833-1917 -- Correspondence.
  • Purvis, Annie (Harriet Ann), 1848-1917 -- Correspondence.
  • Webb, Eugenie, 1856-1919 -- Correspondence.
  • African American women -- Correspondence.
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