Index
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391  Index Abjection, 15, 151, 189, 222–23, 227, 236 Ace, Johnny, 21 Africa. See Blues: African cultural origins of; Crossroads: in African cosmology; Devil: as African cultural inheritance; Devil’s music: African origins of African Americans. See Black man; Black woman African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church: condemnation of dance by, 100; ministers, 33, 35 Alabama, 33, 43, 94, 101, 120, 208 Alexander, “Texas,” 175, 347n19 “All in My Mind” (M. Brown), 84 “Another Woman Booked Out and Bound to Go” (Johnson), 172 Arkansas, 19, 41, 57, 82, 123, 124, 128, 142, 144, 217, 266, 288 Armstrong, Louis, 81, 339n7 Arnold, Eddy, 293 “At da’ Crossroads” (Jones), 313 Bailey, Red Mike, 126 Baker, Houston A., 86, 96, 108, 123, 139, 146, 149 Banjo, 23, 31, 39, 42, 204–5, 339n13 Baptist(s), 35, 41, 60, 81; blues musician as, 7, 21, 47; church-­ building, 32, 64; condemnation of the blues, 47, 72; conversion, 28; distinction between “good music” and “devil’s music,” 320; dress code, 37, 84; founding of Church of God in Christ, 37; and guitar, 36, 37; and “Heaven and Hell” party, 67–68, 106; and Robert Johnson , 319; and migration, 90; minister/ preacher, 32, 33, 38, 43, 45, 48, 50, 55, 74, 80, 83, 97, 102, 179, 185, 320, 321–322, 339n7, 341n51; and morals, 61, 100; National Baptist Convention, 100–101; National Baptist Women’s Convention, 84; and respectability, 81, 83 Barbieri, Vic, 15–16, 255–60, 273, 281, 291–97, 300, 303, 305–6, 307, 311, 325, 357n121, 360n223 Berlin, Irving, 78 Big Bill (Broonzy), 5–6, 13, 36, 96, 124–31, 135, 144, 149, 153, 348n44, 348n58 Big Wheeler, 8 “Black, Brown, and White” (Broonzy), 6, 124–25, 131 Black Diamond Express to Hell (Nix), 90, 101–2, 104 Black man: association with devil’s daughter, 109; as authenticator of younger white blues musician, 235; black woman’s criticism of, 159; in Clarksdale, Miss., 310; complaints about black woman, 183; control over black woman, 164; as creative artist, 17, 53; in Crossroads, 233; and crossroads mythology, 17, 203, 204, 250; as devil figure, 17, 113; in folklore, 111; impact of southern penal system on, 122–23; and Jim Crow, 139; perception of southern white man as devil, 129; as pimp, 85, 95, 105; as preacher, 53; resistance to white authority, 111, 125, 136, 144–45, 347; as superior blues singer, 231, 249; as subject of white violence, 112, 118, 124, 125, 126, 127–28, 138, 141, 151, 164, 178, 348; and white man’s sexual predation, 163, 164; and white woman, 130, 144–45, 164, 178, 250. See also Blues­man; “Devil Jumped the Black Man” 392 Index “Black Mountain Blues” (Smith), 9–10, 188–89 Black woman: black man’s complaints about, 183; black man’s control over, 163; bluesman’s troubled relationship with, 47; as “fallen woman,” 88; lyric use of devil by, 188; as migrant, 74; National League for the Protection of Colored Women, 85, 87; and politics of respectability, 96; and prostitution, 84–85, 95; relationship with black man, 164, 188; and sexual freedom, 154; temptation of, 83; as urban worker, 83; and white bossman, 134; white man’s sexual exploitation of, 163, 164, 178 Black Spider Dumpling. See Twitty, John D. Blind Boy Fuller, 170 Blind Lemon Jefferson, 8, 46 Bloomfield, Michael, 177, 238, 242 “Blue Devil Blues” (Alexander), 175 Blues, 108; and addiction, 181; African cultural origins of, 10–13, 22–25, 132–33, 186, 338n24; association with jazz, 75, 84, 97, 105, 248; association with migration and prostitution, 83–86; audience, 2, 13, 53, 67, 81, 88, 90, 105, 116, 124, 129, 140, 146, 166, 220, 223, 225, 228, 233–34, 237, 239, 240, 253, 287, 308, 315–16, 348n58; awards, 15, 235, 237, 241–42, 243–44, 248, 283; as “bad behavior,” 135; “battle” in Crossroads, 234; black familial condemnation of, 64, 72–73, 82–83, 142; and black masculinity, 152, 163, 168, 173, 180; black ministerial condemnation of, 21–22, 23, 33, 38, 44–46, 51, 53, 60, 72–73, 82–83, 142; black ministerial defense of, 22, 32–33, 48, 321, 341n51; “blues matrix,” 86; British, 246, 355n94; community condemnation of, 83, 148, 200, 213, 318, 320; as confessional mode, 111, 157; in contemporary period, 150–53, 193–94, 199, 214, 235–49, 254, 312–22, 355n93; culture, 1, 13, 18–19, 38, 60, 61, 231, 244, 306, 313; and dancing, 49, 81, 97, 99, 105; Delta, 20, 67–68, 195, 201, 223, 232...


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