In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

notes introduction 1 Unless otherwise noted, all translations are my own. Oyseau, 1619. On Meurisse, see Kaiser, 1923; Schmutz, 2002, 51–­ 81; Smeets, 1942, 681–­ 82; Cuisinier, 1997, 27–­ 45; Boulnois, 2002, 199–­ 237; Agostini, 2008, 273; Gieben, 1990, 688–­ 90; Dedieu, 1987, 79–­ 121; de Morembert, 1970, 181–­ 84; idem, 1968, 468–­ 72; idem, 1965, 143–­ 47; Ignace-­ Marie, 1928, 8; Veuillot, 1921, 430; and Béguet, 1910, 530–­ 50 and 716–­ 38. 2 Oyseau, 1619, 20: “n’est Logicien qu’en peinture & en taille douce.” The word “peinture” did not imply “painting” in the strict sense. In his dictionary Jean Nicot (1530–­ 1600) defines peinture as “pictura” (1606, 470). 3 Oyseau, 1619, 31: “Sont-­ ce là les consequences de la Logique de taille douce?” 4 For sources on illustrated thesis prints, see Gieben, 1993, 273–­ 74n2; and Rice, 1999, 165n1. 5 Oyseau, 1619, 25: “les argumens fondez sur des Allegories ne sont pas demonstrations desquelles on puisse tirer des cõsequences & conclusions necessaires.” 6 The phrase “visual thinking” is famously employed by Rudolf Arnheim , who writes, “Visual thinking calls . . . for the ability to see visual shapes as images of the patterns of forces that underlie our existence—­ the functioning of minds, of bodies or machines, the structure of societies or ideas.” 1969, 315. 7 On the supply of paper and the development of printing technologies, see Landau and Parshall, 1994, 15–­ 16. 8 According to Hubert Damisch, “painting not only shows but thinks” (1994, 446). See also Grootenboer, 2005; eadem, 2011, 13–­ 30; DeLue, 2008; and Bleichmar, 2012. 9 Melion, Dekoninck, and Guiderdoni-­ Bruslé, 2012. O’Malley, 2015. 10 Kemp, 2004, 49 and 134. Rosand, 2002, 97–­ 111. 11 Grootenboer, 2011, 19–­ 23. Cropper and Dempsey, 2000. 12 Roland Barthes remarked in Camera Lucida, “Photography is subversive . . . when it is pensive, when it thinks” (1981, 38). 13 See, for instance, Jacques Rancière’s account of “The Pensive Image” (2009, 107–­ 32) and Boehm, 2001, 43–­ 54. On contemporary painting as “embodied thinking,” see Hudson, 2015, 25. 14 Furetière, 1690, 584: “Interpretation, glose, addition qu’on fait à un Auteur obscur ou difficile, pour le rendre plus intelligible, pour suppleer à ce qu’il n’a pas bien expliqué, ou qu’il supposoit estre connu.” 15 Académie Françoise, 1694, 1:214: “Explication, esclaircissement, observations , & remarques sur quelque Autheur pour expliquer & illustrer son ouvrage.” 16 See Georges Didi-­ Huberman’s discussion of painting as a field of exegesis (1995, 6). 17 Blair, 2010b, 11. 18 On the history of information, see Grafton, 2010, 95–­ 101; Burke, 2000; and Blair, 2003, 11–­ 28. See the “Cultures of Knowledge” project at Oxford University: http://www.culturesofknowledge.org. 19 See, for instance, Goeing, Grafton, and Michel, 2013; Blair, 2010b; Hotson, 2007; Bredekamp, 1995; and Findlen, 1994. 20 For recent studies of the visual and the organization of information, see Freedberg, 2002; Siegel, 2009; and Rosenberg and Grafton, 2010. 21 For information on Gaultier, see Weigert, 1961, 4:414–­ 549; Brugerolles and Guillet, 2000, 1–­ 24; Ehrmann, 1984, 43–­ 46; and Grivel, 1986, 304. Gaultier was an engraver in taille-­douce, or copperplate engraving. 22 On the Descriptio, see Bauer, 1985a, 2–­ 5; eadem, 2000, 481–­ 519; Ferguson , 1987, 9–­ 30; Maas, 1992, 68–­ 72; and Berger, 2013a, 203–­ 49. 23 For discussions of the Synopsis, see Bauer, 1985b, 6–­ 9; eadem, 2000, 495–­ 96; Siegel, 2009, 122–­ 25; and Berger, 2013b, 269–­ 93. 24 On the Laurus metaphysica, see Gieben, 1990, 683–­ 707. 25 On the Typus, see Berger, 2014, 343–­ 66. 26 On Messager, see Selbach, 2010, 35–­ 51. 27 No drawings for any of these broadsides appear to have survived, so it is unclear how Meurisse and Chéron communicated with Gaultier about their designs. It is probable that Meurisse and Chéron wrote the texts on their broadsides. Whereas Gaultier would have engraved the images on thesis prints, it was standard for writing to be engraved by a specialist in lettering: Meyer, 2002, 26. 28 Then as today, paper was the most costly component of a book. Although it is hard to estimate the precise price difference between illustrated and unillustrated printed books, in England illustrated books were advertised at prices that exceeded those of unillustrated ones of roughly the same length by about 75 to 100 percent. Johnson, 1950, 90. Kusukawa, 2012, 50. Studies of seventeenth-­ century Parisian contracts for new illustrated thesis prints reveal that the manufacturing prices could range from 900 to 9,000 livres, depending...

pdf

Additional Information

ISBN
9781400885121
Related ISBN
9780691172279
MARC Record
OCLC
974589768
Pages
352
Launched on MUSE
2017-06-15
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.