Index
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Index abolitionist conspiracy. See conspiracy discourse After Secession: Jefferson Davis and the Failure of Confederate Nationalism (Escott), 4 agricultural identity, 38–41, 59 Ameri­ can Revolution, 27–29, 32, 34, 35–36, 37, 91 amplification, 45, 51–60, 69, 71–72,­81–82 amplification-­by-­intensification, 51, 53, 54 Anderson, Benedict R., 2 Anderson Intelligencer, 42 Andrews, James, 33–34 appropriateness (to prepon), 11, 17– 20, 21 argumentation, amplification vs., 52 Aristotle, 13, 39 Atwill, Janet, 17 Bailyn, Bernard, 28 Beauregard, P. G. T., 79 Beringer, Richard, 26, 30 Blaine, James G., 6 Bragg, Braxton, 4 Breckinridge, John, 7 Brown, Joseph, 48 Browne, Stephen, 28, 41 Buchanan, James, 7, 8, 97n9 Burke, Kenneth, 51, 53, 54 Burns, Anthony, 15–16 Calhoun, John C., 19–20, 27, 35, 36, 43 Callan, John, 25 Campbell, Karlyn Kohrs, 32, 79–80, 82, 85–86, 108n30 Castel, Albert E., 106n5, 107n27 character, as rhetorical tool, 52–53, 55– 57, 68, 69, 70–71 Charleston Mercury, 22, 78 Chattanooga Daily Rebel, 60 chronos, 17 Cicero, 2, 11, 12, 13, 39 citizenry, role of, 35 civic republicanism, 24–43; defined, 28– 29; po­ liti­ cal participation in, 28–29, 34, 35, 36–37; and preserving ­ status quo, 38–41; as rhetorical frame, 27– 29, 32–36, 38–39, 51, 57, 59, 67, 81, 91 class hierarchy, conscription policy and, 49 Clay, Clement, 10 Clayton, Alex, 31 Cleburne, Patrick, 76, 77, 106n5 Cleveland Morning Leader, 68 Cobb, Howell, 25, 31 Cobb, Thomas, 33, 41–42 Committee of Thirteen (Senate), 8–9 common good, 36 Condit, Celeste M., 14, 15 conditional emancipation, 75–88; and Confederate nationalism, 87–88; responses to, 77, 78, 87; rhetorical 116 / Index strategies, 79–86; and states’ rights, 76, 78–79 Confederate identity: agriculture as, 38– 41, 59; and amplification, 45, 58– 60; and conscription policy, 45, 49, 59; erosion of, 2, 3, 5, 76; fundamental changes in, 45, 59; post-­ war reconstitution of, 92–93; slavery as, 3, 74, 86, 92–93; states’ rights as, 3, 35, 37–38, 76, 77, 78–79, 86, 92;­ Stephens on, 64–67, 71, 78 Confederate nationalism, 2, 22–23; Ameri­ can Revolution as basis for, 28; and conditional emancipation, 87– 88; conspiracy discourse as rally­ ing point for, 61–62, 68, 71–74; in­ Davis’s inaugural address, 36; ­ Davis’s Senate resignation speech as foundation of, 11, 22–23; effects of conscription policy on, 49; rhetorical leadership as tool in maintaining, 3–4, 71–72; role of amplification in, 51–60, 71–72 Confederate States of America, 25–26 Conscription Act, passage of, 45, 48–49 conscription policy, 44–60, 75; conditions leading to, 45–46; and Confederate identity, 45, 49, 59; effects on Confederate nationalism, 49; exemptions to, 4, 49, 57, 60; population eligible, 48; responses to, 48–49, 60; rhetorical style regarding, 51–60, 80; and states’ rights, 48–49. See also conditional emancipation conspiracy discourse, 10, 61–74; ­ effects of, 62, 65; as rallying point for Confederate nationalism, 61–62, 68,­71–74 Constitutional authority, 65, 66 Cooper, William, 9, 49 Daily Dispatch, 41 Daily Exchange, 21, 41 Daily Intelligencer, 60 Davis, Jefferson: decline in credibility of, 79–83; election of, 25–26, 29–32;­ facial disorder (trigeminal neuralgia) of, 10; final address as president, 89– 91; lack of predecessors, 2; Lee’s eulogy , 92; post-­ Senate resignation life, 25; rhetorical legacy of, 89–93; Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government , 92; as Secretary of War, 19, 20, 25; shortsightedness of, 1–5, 13, 41–43, 60, 62, 71–72, 87–88, 91; as spokesman for the South, 7–8 Davis, Varina, 10, 12, 21–22, 26 Davis, William: on conscription policy, 46, 49; on Davis’s election, 30; on Davis’s inauguration speech, 24, 41; on secession, 8, 36–37; on shifts in Davis’s rhetorical style, 51, 58; on the winter of 1864–1865, 79 deception, 56, 82, 108n30 decorum, 11–12, 15, 17–18, 20–22, 69 De Leon, Edwin, 9 deliberative rhetoric, 13–14, 15 Democratic Party, 7, 9 desperation, 75–88; early signs of, 45– 51; final days of, 76–79; rhetorical strategies for, 79–83, 86–89 Douglas, Stephen, 7, 9 draft. See conscription policy Dred Scott v. Sanford, 7 Durden, Robert F., 76 Edgefield Advisor, 42 Emancipation Proclamation (Lincoln), 3, 60, 61–74; and conspiracy discourse, 62–67, 68; Davis’s response to, 61– 62, 67–71, 72–74, 91–92, 92–93; media response to, 72–73, 74 Enquirer, 87 epideictic rhetoric...