Part I. Intellectual Obstacles to the Notion of Early Transoceanic Contacts
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

I Intellectual Obstacles to the Notion of Early Transoceanic Contacts Things are seldom what they seem. —Sir W. S. Gilbert, 1878 In 2010, the maverick archaeologist Alice Beck Kehoe wrote, frustratedly, “For mainstream archaeologists, pre-­ Columbian contacts have been a dead issue. Primitive people couldn’t cross oceans, that settles it.” As a more conventional archaeologist expressed this attitude: “I find it more difficult to accept claims of diffusion when the alleged recipient culture is separated from the donor culture by a wide ocean.”1 An evidentiary double standard is being applied. The view, that pre-­ 1492 sailors were incapable of crossing the Atlantic—not to mention the Pacific—before the Middle Ages, rests on a number of well-­ embedded myths. Part I of this book examines and refutes these misconceptions, beginning in chapter 1 by comparing the world’s realities to people’s misperceptions, past and present, of that world. ...