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The house where Veit Harlan grew up, Berlin-Halensee, 1910. Courtesy of Maria Kerzel-Körber. Walter Harlan, Veit’s father, 1910. Courtesy of Maria Kerzel-Körber. Adele Harlan, Veit Harlan’s mother, 1910. Courtesy of Maria Kerzel-Körber. Veit Harlan in the mid-1920s, wearing a black leather coat. Courtesy of Maria Kerzel-Körber. Veit Harlan at the time he had his breakthrough as a stage actor in Max Halbe’s drama Jugend (Youth), 1925. Courtesy of the Theatersammlung Wilhelm Richter, Berlin. In the silent comedy 1+1=3, scripted by film theoretician Béla Balász, the hapless hero Paul (Veit Harlan) is comforted by two friends (Lissi Arna, Siegfried Arno), 1927. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Gerda Müller and Veit Harlan onstage in Frank Wedekind’s drama Lulu, 1926, the source for the Louise Brooks classic Pandora’s Box. Courtesy of the Theatersammlung Wilhelm Richter, Berlin. Hilde Körber in 1928, around the time she fell in love with Veit Harlan. Courtesy of the Theatersammlung Wilhelm Richter, Berlin. Veit Harlan in the late 1920s. Courtesy of the Theatersammlung Wilhelm Richter, Berlin. Veit Harlan (far left, front row) onstage with Alexander Granach and Walter Franck in Friedrich Schiller’s Sturm and Drang classic Die Räuber (The robbers) in 1932. Courtesy of the Theatersammlung Wilhelm Richter, Berlin. Hertha Thiele, Hans Brausewetter, Veit Harlan, and Heinz Klingenberg in the militarist drama Die elf Schill’schen Offiziere (The eleven Schill officers, 1932). Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Lotte (Suse Graf) and Fritz (Albert Lieven) fall in love in Kater Lampe (Lampe the cat, 1936), Harlan’s first stage-to-screen adaptation with extended outdoor shots. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Veit Harlan and Hilde Körber, both very humble looking, with their children, Thomas and Maria, in 1933. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Maria (Hilde Körber) and Franz (Hans Schlenck) in a tense moment from Maria, die Magd (Maria the maid, 1936), Harlan’s first melodrama. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. The playbill for Die Kreutzersonate (The Kreutzer Sonata, 1936) emphasizes husband Posdnyshev’s (Peter Petersen) intimidating, God-like presence. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Script conference for Der Herrscher (The ruler, 1937) at the estate of Emil Jannings (center, seated) in pre-Anschluss Austria, with Harlan (third from left) and scriptwriter Thea von Harbou, the ex-wife of Fritz Lang. Courtesy of Jörg Jannings. By his size alone, Academy Award winner Emil Jannings makes it clear to Veit Harlan who is in charge of Der Herrscher. Courtesy of Jörg Jannings. Industrialist Matthias Clausen (Emil Jannings) inspects his factories in a scene missing from surviving prints of Der Herrscher. Courtesy of Jörg Jannings. Veit Harlan and Emil Jannings visit Adolf Hitler in the company of Joseph Goebbels, May 1937. Note Harlan’s and Goebbels’s uneasy posture in comparison with Jannings’s relaxed stance. Courtesy of the Stiftung Deutsche Kinemathek, Berlin. A visibly self-confident Veit Harlan and his second wife, Hilde Körber, were already estranged when they visited this Filmball—a festivity with music attended exclusively by film people in elegant evening wardrobe—in 1937. Courtesy of Maria Kerzel-Körber. Annchen (Kristina Söderbaum) in one of several receptive positions she adopts throughout Jugend. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Newcomers Kristina Söderbaum and Hermann Braun on the cover of a playbill for Jugend (Youth, 1938). Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. The main cast of Jugend. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Annchen is mourned by vicar Schigorski (Werner Hinz) and priest Hoppe (Eugen Klöpfer) in Jugend. Courtesy of Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Hans (Hermann Braun) searches the lake for his beloved Annchen in Jugend. Courtesy of Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Veit Harlan, with dark sunglasses, gives instructions to Kristina Söderbaum and Frits van Dongen on the set of Verwehte Spuren (Lost traces, 1938). Courtesy of Maria Kerzel-Körber. In Das unsterbliche Herz (The immortal heart, 1939), apprentice sculptor Konrad (Raimund Schelcher) loves his master Henlein (Heinrich George) as much as or more than he loves Henlein’s wife, Ev (Kristina Söderbaum). Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Séraphine (Kristina Söderbaum) spends most of Verwehte Spuren searching for her mother, who seems to be lost in Paris. Courtesy of the Berliner Filmantiquariat Patricia Kaufmann. Konrad is in love with Ev, his master’s young wife...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780813167022
Related ISBN
9780813167008
MARC Record
OCLC
940502002
Pages
464
Launched on MUSE
2016-02-26
Language
English
Open Access
No
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