Manifesto II (Denmark, 1987)
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174 • N A T I O N A L A N D T R A N S N A T I O N A L C I N E M A S bitter old film-maker, a dull puritan who praises the intellect-crushing virtues of niceness. We want to see heterosexual films, made for, about and by men. We want visibility! MANIFESTO II (Denmark, 1987) Lars von Trier [First published 17 May 1987 to coincide with the premiere of Epidemic at the Cannes Film Festival.] Everything seems fine. Young men are living in stable relationships with a new generation of films. The birth-control methods which are assumed to have contained the epidemic have only served to make birth control more effective: no unexpected creations, no illegitimate children—the genes are intact. These young men’s relationships resemble the endless stream of Grand Balls in a bygone age. There are also those who live together in rooms with no furniture. But their love is growth without soul, replication without any bite. Their “wildness” lacks discipline and their “discipline” lacks wildness. long live the bagatelle! The bagatelle is humble and all-encompassing. It reveals creativity without making a secret of eternity. Its frame is limited but magnanimous, and therefore leaves space for life. Epidemic manifests itself in a well-grounded and serious relationship with these young men, as a bagatelle—because among bagatelles, the masterpieces are easy to count. MANIFESTO III: I CONFESS! (Denmark, 1990) Lars von Trier [First published 29 December 1990 to coincide with the premiere of Europa.] Seemingly all is well: Film director Lars von Trier is a scientist, artist, and human being. And yet I say: I am a human being. But I’m an artist. But I’m a film director. ...