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127 Notes Intro­ duc­ tion 1. In most cases, at­ tempts to re­ con­ struct fam­ ily his­ tory at the local level in­ volve care­ ful re­ view of doc­ u­ ments found in the court­ house of the re­ spec­ tive ­ county. In this case, how­ ever, Lick­ ing ­ County’s court­ house was de­ stroyed in a fire in 1875, and ­ nearly all of­ fi­ cial doc­ u­ ments deal­ ing with ­ births, mar­ riages, and ­ deaths were lost. Some ­ records were re­ con­ structed from cen­ sus ­ records, ­ church and ce­ me­ tery ­ records, and news­ paper ac­ counts, but there re­ main sig­ nif­i­ cant gaps. That is es­ pe­ cially true for black ­ Americans liv­ ing in New­ ark be­ fore 1875. Much of that re­ con­ struc­ tion was done by the Lick­ ing­ County Ge­ ne­ a­ log­ ical So­ ci­ ety and is most com­ plete for prom­ i­ nent white fam­ i­ lies. None of the ­ records from the pre-1875 pe­ riod are found in the Ohio State ­ Archives. There were no pe­ ri­ odic state cen­ suses taken in Ohio. The 1840 cen­ sus lists only head of house­ hold and num­ bers of per­ sons ­ within that house­ hold. In that in­ stance, only Sam­ uel ­ Scott’s name was ­ listed. ­ William T. ­ Scott’s ­ father’s name was not. 2. For a brief dis­ cus­ sion of ­ Ohio’s Black Laws, see Tay­ lor, Fron­ tiers of Free­ dom, 32–35. For a de­ scrip­ tion of the de­ bate on is­ sues of civil ­ rights for ­ blacks as held at the 1802 con­ ven­ tion, see Quil­ lin, Color Line, 11–20. See also Wood­ son, “Negro in Cin­ cin­ nati,” 2–3, for a pre­ cise de­ scrip­ tion of these laws. 3. An Act, to Reg­ u­ late Black and Mu­ latto Per­ sons, chap. 21, 5 Jan­ u­ ary 1804, 1804 Ohio Laws 356, as cited in Fin­ kel­ man, “John Bing­ ham,” 672. A let­ ter from Tyler Ri­ della to Bruce ­ Mouser dated 10 June 2011 in­ di­ cated that the clerk of ­ courts of Lick­ ing ­ County, Ohio, had ­ searched their ­ records and found none that re­ lated to re­ quired reg­ is­ tra­ tion of­ blacks in com­ pli­ ance with this or sub­ se­ quent laws. 4. Quil­ lin, Color Line, 21–22; ­ Sheller, “Strug­ gle of the Negro,” 210. See Love, “Reg­ is­ tra­ tion of Free ­ Blacks,” 39, for de­ tails from the 1804 and 1807 bills. 5. An Act Reg­ u­ lat­ ing Black and Mu­ latto Per­ sons, chap. 8, 25 Jan­ u­ ary 1807, 1807 Ohio Laws 53, as cited in Fin­ kel­ man, “Strange Ca­ reer,” 377, 384–85. 128 Notes to pages 5–9 6. Cop­ ies of the 1804 and 1807 acts are ap­ pended to Tay­ lor, Fron­ tiers of Free­ dom, 203–5. For laws re­ spect­ ing the mi­ li­ tia and ju­ ries, see Quil­ lin, Color Line, 22–23, 33. For tes­ ti­ mony ­ against a white per­ son, see Baily, “From Cin­ cin­ nati, Ohio,” 427. 7. Moody, “Too Many Ques­ tions,” 18. 8. Mid­ dle­ ton, Black Laws, 5, 55. See also Fin­ kel­ man, Im­ per­ fect Union, 156. 9. Ho­ ward, “Chang­ ing the Law,” 30. See also Mid­ dle­ ton, Black Laws, 5. See the Zaines­ ville (OH) ­ Courier, 4 Jan­ u­ ary 1849, 3, for a list of res­ o­ lu­ tions being con­ sid­ ered in­ Ohio’s leg­ is­ la­ ture that were at­ tempt­ ing to de­ fine the word “white.” 10. ­ Sheller, “Strug­ gle of the Negro,” 217; Fin­ kel­ man, “Strange Ca­ reer,” 291–93. 11. For a dis­ cus­ sion of dif­ fer­ ences ­ between north­ ern, south­ ern, and cen­ tral Ohio, see Ger­ ber, Black Ohio, 9–14. 12. Gra­ ham, His­ tory of Lick­ ing ­ County, 436. 13. Fin­ kel­ man, “Strange Ca­ reer,” 385, 387–88. 14. Wood­ son, “Negro in Cin­ cin­ nati,” 6–7; Mid­ dle­ ton, Black Laws, 71–72; ­ Sheller, “Strug­ gle of the Negro,” 213. 15. New­ ark (OH) Ad­ vo­ cate, 22 April 1984. 16. King, “Ab­ o­ li­ tion­ ists in Gran­ ville,” 1–2. 17. See Price, “Fur­ ther Notes,” 367, for a set of res­ o­ lu­ tions ­ adopted by the group that­ formed Lick­ ing ­ County’s...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780299301835
Related ISBN
9780299301842
MARC Record
OCLC
892686692
Pages
200
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-09
Language
English
Open Access
No
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