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acknowledgments The writing of this book has amply, perhaps redundantly, proven its own thesis that philanthropy—in all possible meanings of the word—is a necessity in intellectual work. My family has always embodied for me the original meaning of and real possibilities in the word philanthropy. I cannot thank Josh Piker and Naima Sawaya enough or in words that are adequate. Josh read and re-read the book and improved the conception and expression of everything in it. Naima did many other things than read the book, and her joy in all those things provided both inspiration and motivation. They are the best, funniest, and wisest companions anyone could hope for. The same is true of my parents, Ann Rosa and Fares Sawaya, and my sister, Marie. Their intellectual and personal generosity in the world, in their work, and to family and friends has meant everything to me. Without them, the book would never have been completed. Thanks also for all the kindness and help of the members of my extended family—Rosas, Sawayas, Prestandreas, Pikers, Ryans, Egans, and Portillos—with special appreciation for Barbara, Therese, Peter and Sherri, Paul and Fernanda, Miguel and Tracy, Matthew, Steve, Jeff, Ellie and John. Friends—in the best sense of the word—have been crucial. I have relied in this book (as in everything else) on Jean Gregorek’s brilliance, funniness, and generosity. She continues to be, as everyone knows, the greatest one. My conversations with Catherine John about intellectual, pedagogical, and life matters more generally have inspired and sustained me for the decade I have known her. Tamar Katz’s virtuoso writing has been an ideal to aspire to since graduate school, while her combination of exceptional kindness and incisiveness as a thinker and reader has made my work far better than it would otherwise be. In many long walks and even longer park dates with our kids, Danyelle O’Hara shared not only much wisdom and many good laughs but also her experience and insights into the non-profit and philanthropic worlds. Dan Cottom was endlessly kind and funny, while also 248 Acknowledgments always providing speedy and helpful feedback. For their support, I also want to thank Susanah and Charles Romney, Jen Frost and John Herron, Sandie Holguin and Bob Rundstrom, Cathy Kelly and Rich Hamerla, Megan Elwood Madden and Andy Madden, Saralinda Subbiondo, Tina McGinnis-Subbiondo, Toni Lombard, Stacy Burton, Francesca Polletta and Ed Amenta, Julie Vandivere, Rita Keresztesi, Melissa Homestead, Jim Zeigler, Susan Kates, Tim Murphy, Wendy Gram, Marc David, Catherine Tufariello and Jeremy Telman, Julie Gozan and Tom Keck, Mary Dinger, Julia Abramson, Ari and Lesley Kelman, John Heins and Margaret Gonglewski, and of course, all their kiddos. Finally, I want to thank a number of colleagues and institutions for their support in writing this book. Ann Ardis, David Mair, and as always Mark Seltzer have been gracious, generous, and helpful mentors. I also want to express my deep gratitude to the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, and the University of Oklahoma, which together provided me with the time and financial resources necessary to research and write. Two interdisciplinary conferences convened by Richard Dunn and Mary Maples Dunn, and sponsored by the American Philosophical Society and the Humboldt Foundation, expanded my thinking as did the Midwest Nineteenth-Century Americanists’ writing group. Susi Krasnoo and Roy Ritchie kindly provided office space at the Huntington Library during a happy year of work. I also need to thank two anonymous readers for the University of Pennsylvania Press for their detailed, encouraging , and thoughtful feedback. I feel exceptionally lucky that Jerry Singerman has been my editor for two books and thank him, Carolyn Hayes, and Alison Anderson for all their work on and for this book. ...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780812290035
Related ISBN
9780812246308
MARC Record
OCLC
884615827
Pages
264
Launched on MUSE
2014-08-16
Language
English
Open Access
No
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