restricted access THE EFFECT OF INSTRUCTION UPON ATTITUDES
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V. THE EFFECT OF INSTRUCTION UPON ATTITUDES CORRELATION METHOD USED WITH PAIRED GROUPS Several attempts were made to evaluate the effect of instruction upon the attitudes ofparents toward the individual behavior items. First of all, a correlation technique was worked out to show the amount of agreement between ratings on first and on second tests taken by the same individuals. Since the intervals between categories were unequal, scale values were computed according to the method described by Kelley (20). Thus 45.2 per cent of the mothers filling out Form Ai for the first time considered truancy (Item 26) very serious, 43.2 per cent rated it as serious, 9.8 per cent of little importance, and 1.9 per cent of no importance at all. According to the Kelley-Wood Tables, the rating of very serious is equivalent to a position .8762 standard deviations above the mean of the group; the rating of serious is .4647 standard deviations below the mean, and so on. These scale values were worked out for the paired groups that filledout Form Ai (288 cases) and Form A2 (262 cases). When first and second replies for the two forms were correlated for each of the fifty traits, the coefficients obtained ranged all the way from .137 for masturbation in girls of 5 to .598 for slovenliness in boys of 5. The mean correlations between first and second tests were .329 for Form Ai and .360 for Form Az. The mean correlation for both forms was highest for personal-social and lowest for neurotic traits, indicating that mothers changed their opinions most concerning the seriousness of neurotic traits. The actual means for Form Ai were .365 for personal-social traits, .325 for delinquent traits, and .293 for neurotic traits. The corresponding means for Form A2 were .410, .365, and .302. Because of the laborious procedure and the difficulty of interpreting results, the scale values for the other forms were not computed. The coefficients for the fifty traits are given in Table 24. Percentage of parents who considered traits of little or no importance before and ajter instruction. — Figures 3,4, and 5 show the change after instruction in attitudes toward delinquent, neurotic, and personal-social traits in boys and in girls at the three age levels. City and rural mothers and educational and 70 EFFECT OF INSTRUCTION UPON ATTITUDES 71 TABLE 24.— COEFFICIENTS OF CORRELATION FOR RATINGS OF BEHAVIOR TRAITS ON FIRST AND ON SECOND TESTS Trait Tardiness Destructiveness .. Imaginative lying Stealing . . Tendency to depression Profanity Interrupting Faultfinding . .. Masturbation Boisterousness . .. Meddling Whispering Lack of interest . . Cowardice Laziness . . Disobedience Unsocialness . . Defiance Nervous habits .. Sullenness Smoking Forgetfulness Slovenliness Domineering . . .. Form AI qnc .. .152 •• -359 172 160 161 34.6 2QC 21? T-27 . . .374. T.f\A . . 161 - . -342 .. A1^ 3<;2 • • -2 97 •207 28? .. .147 278 •?8? .. .366 . . .418 320 Form A2 .269 .200 •504 .272 •395 •357 .442 .442 .286 .358 40O 440 449 .240 •3H •350 .310 471 •367 -323 .229 479 -383 .598 •358 Trait Truancy Cheating Lvine Enuresis Form Ai • • -37° 374. . . .208 A'Z'l . . .281 • • • -374 3C7 Heterosexual activity 422 Quarrelsomeness . Temper Stubbornness . .. Irresponsibility . Suspiciousness .. Cruelty Shyness Tattling Fearfulness . ... ... .388 104. • • • -3^9 317 . - . .3


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