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FOREWORD (FOGARTY) 1 ‘The Day of the Rabblement’, Occasional, Critical and Political Writing. Ed. Kevin Barry (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 50–2. 2 Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (London: The Hogarth Press, 1985). 3 On second-wave ecocriticism, see Lawrence Buell, The Future of Environmental Criticism: Environmental Crisis and Literary Imagination (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005), pp. 17–28 and for an overview of current critiques of pastoralism and arguments for a post-equilibrium ecology, see Greg Garrard, Ecocriticism. Second Edition (London: Routledge, 2012), pp. 36–92. 4 Timothy Morton, Ecology Without Nature: Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics (Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2007), pp. 1–28. 5 ‘Tilly’, Poems and Exiles. Ed. J.C.C. Mays (London: Penguin, 1992), p. 42. 6 On the function of animal motifs in Ulysses, see Maud Ellmann, “Ulysses: Changing into an Animal”, Field Day Review, ed. Seamus Deane and Breandán MacSuibhne 2 (2008): 75–110. 7 A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Ed. John Paul Riquelme (New York: Norton), p. 5. 8 ‘Calypso’, Ulysses. Ed. Hans Walter Gabler with Wolfhard Steppe and Claus Melchior (London: Bodley Head, 1986), pp. 45–57. 9 See J.M. Synge, The Aran Islands (London: Penguin, 1992), p. 33. 10 A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, pp. 149–50. 11 “Nausicaa”, Ulysses, pp. 284–313. 12 Finnegans Wake (London: Penguin, 1992), pp. 593–628. 13 Bonnie Kime Scott, In the Hollow of the Wave: Virginia Woolf and the Modern Uses of Nature (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012). INTRODUCTION (BRAZEAU AND GLADWIN) 1 Seamus Heaney, Eamonn Wall, Maeve McGuckian, and Patrick Kavanagh, all suggest themselves immediately, but the list is much, much longer. In this volume, Bonnie Kime Scott looks at Joyce and Eavan Boland together. 2 William Rueckert, ‘Literature and Ecology’, in Cheryl Glotfelty and Harold Fromm (eds.), The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology (Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 1996), p. 121. 3 Lawrence Buell, The Future of Environmental Criticism: Environmental Crisis and Literary Imagination (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2005), pp. 12–13. 269 Notes and References 4 Cheryll Glotfelty, ‘Introduction: Literary Studies in an Age of Environmental Crisis’, in Cheryll Glotfelty and Harold Fromm (eds.) The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology (Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 1996), p. xix. 5 Contributors to this collection will be using some of these terms interchangeably . Because ecocrtitical theory has expanded so rapidly in the last twenty years, it is would be impossible to outline the theory here in greater depth. We rely mainly on the use of ecocriticism because it is still the most widely recognised term. For more on recent trends and subsequent texts in ecocriticism see Lawrence Buell, Stacy Alaimo, Greg Garrard and Timothy Morton, as well as going to ASLE’s website at www.asle.org. 6 Buell, The Future of Environmental Criticism, pp. 22–23. 7 See Liam Leonard, The Environmental Movement in Ireland (New York: Springer, 2008), pp. 45–49, and Mark Boyle, ‘Cleaning Up After the Celtic Tiger: Scalar ‘fixes’ in the Political Ecology of Tiger Economies’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 27:2 (2002), pp. 172–194, as well as the writings of the Irish environmentalist Michael Viney. 8 Gerry Smyth, Space and the Irish Cultural Imagination (London: Palgrave, 2001), p. 10. 9 Smyth, ‘Shite and Sheep: An Ecocritical Perspective on Two Recent Irish Novels’, in ‘Contemporary Irish Fiction’, special issue, Irish University Review 30: 1 (2000), p. 164. 10 John Wilson Foster, ‘Preface’, in John Wilson Foster (ed.) Nature in Ireland: A Scientific and Cultural History (Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 1997), p. xi. 11 It is also important to note that Foster was the keynote speaker at the ‘Ireland and Ecocriticism: An Interdisciplinary Conference’ in June 2010, where he examined the tensions and successes in defining and subsequently constructing an Irish ecocriticism in his presentation, ‘The Challenges to an Irish Ecocriticism’. 12 See Marisol Morales Ladrón, ‘James Joyce’s Early Writings and Ecocritical Theory: A New Turn?’, pp. 197–210 and Margarita Estévez Saá, ‘Could We Speak About an Eco-Feminist Joyce? in Universidad de Deusto (ed.) New Perspective on James Joyce (La Rioja: Dialnet, 2010), pp. 211–224. 13 Sean Latham, ‘Twenty-first-century Critical Contexts’, in John McCourt (ed.), James Joyce in Context (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), p. 156. 14 Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism (New York: Vintage, 1993), p. 225. 15 Timothy Clark, The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781782050735
Related ISBN
9781782050728
MARC Record
OCLC
882713144
Launched on MUSE
2014-07-04
Language
English
Open Access
No
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