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Women's Studies, Gender, and Sexuality > LGBT Studies

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Minorités sexuelles, Internet et santé Cover

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Minorités sexuelles, Internet et santé

Edited by Joseph Josy Lévy

Les nouvelles technologies de communication, et notamment Internet, ont transformé à la fois les stratégies relationnelles et la transmission et le partage des informations dans toutes les sphères de la vie, incluant le domaine de la santé. Pour les minorités sexuelles qui sont confrontées à de multiples formes de discrimination et de marginalisation, Internet est devenu un puissant moyen de s’organiser, d’informer et d’intervenir dans le champ de la santé. Les associations et organismes communautaires ciblant ces populations proposent aujourd’hui un ensemble de sites et de stratégies de soutien et d’intervention. Ces outils synchrones et asynchrones disponibles en ligne visent l’amélioration de la santé mentale et physique, des relations interpersonnelles et la prévention des ITSS et du VIH/sida. Par contre, les usages qui varient en fonction des populations LGBT peuvent aussi concourir à la prise de risques et à des formes de dépendance.Afin de mieux comprendre les enjeux entourant les usages d’Internet et la santé, cet ouvrage, réalisé grâce à l’appui de l’équipe pancanadienne Sexualités et genres  ;: vulnérabilité et résilience (SVR), regroupe les contributions de chercheurs de l’équipe qui ont effectué des travaux sur Internet et la santé ainsi que d’intervenants impliqués dans des organismes communautaires, qui utilisent des sites Internet à des fins de réseautage, de transfert d’informations et d’interventions en ligne dans les contextes québécois et canadien.

Mr. Ding’s Chicken Feet Cover

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Mr. Ding’s Chicken Feet

On a Slow Boat from Shanghai to Texas

Gillian Kendall

After accepting a job teaching English on a small engineering vessel traveling from Shanghai to Texas, Gillian Kendall embarks on a strange journey with no ports of call but exotic emotional landscapes. She is the only female aboard, surrounded by Chinese men. The cosmopolitan graduate student suddenly has to adjust to an alien world, thick with cigarette smoke, unusual sea creatures, and male sexuality. Kendall invites readers to travel with her across cultural divides as deep and mysterious as the Pacific while she explores her own culture, orientation, and heart.

My Desire for History Cover

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My Desire for History

Essays in Gay, Community, and Labor History

Allan Bérubé

Bringing together the best of the late Allan Bérubé's published and unpublished work, this collection explores the growth of gay and lesbian history from its grassroots beginnings in the 1970s. D'Emilio and Freedman, who were friends of the author's, compiled the essays and have written a substantial introduction that provides a biographical portrait of a life of (largely self-taught)scholarship and of committed activism in the peace and gay liberation movements and later involvement with queer activism and class conscious, anti-racist scholarship.

My Diva Cover

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My Diva

65 Gay Men on the Women Who Inspire Them

Edited by Michael Montlack

From Elizabeth Taylor, Bette Midler, and Diana Ross to Queen Elizabeth I, Julia Child, and Princess Leia, these divas have been sister, alter ego, fairy godmother, or model for survival to gay men and the closeted boys they once were. And anyone—straight or gay, young or old, male or female—who ever needed a muse, or found one, will see their own longing mirrored here as well.
    These witty and poignant short essays explore reasons for diva-worship as diverse as the writers themselves. My Diva offers both depth and glamour as it pays tribute with joy, intelligence, and fierce, fierce love.
 
 
Finalist, Lambda Book Award for LGBT Anthology, Lambda Literary Foundation

My Father and I Cover

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My Father and I

The Marais and the Queerness of Community

"It is a living museum of a long-gone Jewish life and, supposedly, a testimony to the success of the French model of social integration. It is a communal home where gay men and women are said to stand in defiance of the French model of social integration. It is a place of freedom and tolerance where people of color and lesbians nevertheless feel unwanted and where young Zionists from the suburbs gather every Sunday and sometimes harass Arabs. It is a hot topic in the press and on television. It is open to the world and open for business. It is a place to be seen and a place of invisibility. It is like a home to me, a place where I feel both safe and out of place and where my father felt comfortable and alienated at the same time. It is a place of nostalgia, innovation, shame, pride, and anxiety, where the local and the global intersect for better and for worse. And for better and for worse, it is a French neighborhood."-from My Father and I

Mixing personal memoir, urban studies, cultural history, and literary criticism, as well as a generous selection of photographs, My Father and I focuses on the Marais, the oldest surviving neighborhood of Paris. It also beautifully reveals the intricacies of the relationship between a Jewish father and a gay son, each claiming the same neighborhood as his own. Beginning with the history of the Marais and its significance in the construction of a French national identity, David Caron proposes a rethinking of community and looks at how Jews, Chinese immigrants, and gays have made the Marais theirs.

These communities embody, in their engagement of urban space, a daily challenge to the French concept of universal citizenship that denies them all political legitimacy. Caron moves from the strictly French context to more theoretical issues such as social and political archaism, immigration and diaspora, survival and haunting, the public/private divide, and group friendship as metaphor for unruly and dynamic forms of community, and founding disasters such as AIDS and the Holocaust. Caron also tells the story of his father, a Hungarian Jew and Holocaust survivor who immigrated to France and once called the Marais home.

My Germany Cover

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My Germany

A Jewish Writer Returns to the World His Parents Escaped

Lev Raphael

Haunted by his parents’ horrific suffering and traumatic losses under Nazi rule, Lev Raphael grew up loathing everything German. Those feelings shaped his Jewish identity, his life, and his career. While researching his mother’s war years after her death, he discovers a distant relative living in the very city where she had worked in a slave labor camp, found freedom, and met his father. Soon after, Raphael is launched on book tours in Germany and, in the process, redefines himself as someone unafraid to face the past and let it go.

 

Bookmarks, “Top Ten Nonfiction Titles of 2009”

Napoleonic Friendship: Military Fraternity, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century France Cover

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Napoleonic Friendship: Military Fraternity, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century France

Military Fraternity, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century France

Brian Joseph Martin

Following the French Revolution, radical military reforms created conditions for new physical and emotional intimacy between soldiers, establishing a model of fraternal affection that would persist from the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars through the Franco-Prussian War and World War I.

Based on extensive research in French and American archives, and enriched by his reading of Napoleonic military memoirs and French military fiction from Hugo and Balzac to Zola and Proust, Brian Joseph Martin's view encompasses a broad range of emotional and erotic relationships in French armies from 1789 to 1916. He argues that the French Revolution's emphasis on military fraternity evolved into an unprecedented sense of camaraderie among soldiers in the armies of Napoleon. For many soldiers, the hardships of combat led to intimate friendships. For some, the homosociality of military life inspired mutual affection, lifelong commitment, and homoerotic desire.

The Nearness of Others Cover

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The Nearness of Others

Searching for Tact and Contact in the Age of HIV

David Caron


“Funny how a gay man’s hand resting heavily on your shoulder used to say let’s fuck but now means let’s not. Funny how ostensible nearness really betrays distance sometimes.” —from The Nearness of Others



In this radical, genre-bending narrative, David Caron tells the story of his 2006 HIV diagnosis and its aftermath. On one level, The Nearness of Others is a personal account of his struggle as a gay, HIV-positive man with the constant issue of if, how, and when to disclose his status. But searching for various forms of contact eventually leads to a profound reassessment of tact as a way to live and a way to think, with our bodies and with the bodies of others.

In a series of brief, compulsively readable sections that are by turns moving and witty, Caron recounts his wary yet curious exploration of an unfamiliar medical universe at once hostile and protective as he embarks on a new life of treatment without end. He describes what it is like to live with a disease that is no longer a death sentence but continues to terrify many people as if it were. In particular, living with HIV provides an unexpected opportunity to reflect on an age of terror and war, when fear and suspicion have become the order of the day. Most of all, Caron reminds us that disclosing HIV-positive status is still far from easy, least of all in one of the many states—such as his own—that have criminalized nondisclosure and/or exposure.

Going well beyond Caron’s personal experience, The Nearness of Others examines popular culture and politics as well as literary memoirs and film to ask deeper philosophical questions about our relationships with others. Ultimately, Caron eloquently demonstrates a form of disclosure, sharing, and contact that stands against the forces working to separate us.

New Choices, New Families Cover

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New Choices, New Families

How Lesbians Decide about Motherhood

Nancy J. Mezey

How do lesbians decide to become mothers or remain childfree? Why do new families form at particular historical moments? These questions are at the heart of Nancy J. Mezey’s New Choices, New Families. Researchers, politicians, and society at large continue to debate the changing American family, especially nontraditional families that emerge from divorce, remarriage, grandparents-as-parents, and adoption. This ongoing discussion also engages the controversy surrounding the parental rights of same-sex couples and their families. New Choices, New Families enters into this conversation. Mezey asks why lesbians are forming families at this particular historical moment and wonders how race, class, sexual identity, and family history factor into the decision-making process. Drawing heavily from personal interviews, Mezey’s groundbreaking analysis gives voice to groups long underrepresented in similar studies—black, Latina, working class, and childfree lesbians. Some chapters examine how childhood experiences contribute to the desire to become a mother, while others consider the influence of women’s partners and careers. New Choices, New Families provides thoughtful insights into questions about sexual identity, social and cultural expectations, and what and who constitute a family.

Nobody Is Supposed to Know Cover

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Nobody Is Supposed to Know

Black Sexuality on the Down Low

C. Riley Snorton


Since the early 2000s, the phenomenon of the “down low”—black men who have sex with men as well as women and do not identify as gay, queer, or bisexual—has exploded in news media and popular culture, from the Oprah Winfrey Show to R & B singer R. Kelly’s hip hopera Trapped in the Closet. Most down-low stories are morality tales in which black men are either predators who risk infecting their unsuspecting female partners with HIV or victims of a pathological black culture that repudiates openly gay identities. In both cases, down-low narratives depict black men as sexually dangerous, duplicitous, promiscuous, and contaminated.

In Nobody Is Supposed to Know, C. Riley Snorton traces the emergence and circulation of the down low in contemporary media and popular culture to show how these portrayals reinforce troubling perceptions of black sexuality. Reworking Eve Sedgwick’s notion of the “glass closet,” Snorton advances a new theory of such representations in which black sexuality is marked by hypervisibility and confinement, spectacle and speculation. Through close readings of news, music, movies, television, and gossip blogs, Nobody Is Supposed to Know explores the contemporary genealogy, meaning, and functions of the down low.

Snorton examines how the down low links blackness and queerness in the popular imagination and how the down low is just one example of how media and popular culture surveil and police black sexuality. Looking at figures such as Ma Rainey, Bishop Eddie L. Long, J. L. King, and Will Smith, he ultimately contends that down-low narratives reveal the limits of current understandings of black sexuality.

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