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Tactics of the Human

Experimental Technics in American Fiction

Laura Shackelford

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Tad Lincoln's Father

Julia Taft Bayne

To others, he was the American President, one of the most powerful men in the world, presiding over one of the most horrific wars in history. But to Julia Taft, he was Tad Lincoln's father. Invited to the White House to watch over her two brothers, who were playmates of the Lincolns' sons, Julia had an intimate perspective on the First Family's home life, which she describes with charm and candor in this book. A rare look behind the public facade of the great man, Julia's affectionate account of the Lincolns at home is rich with examples of the humor and love that held the family together and that helped the President endure the pressures of governing a nation divided.
 
Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln often expressed their regret at not having a daughter of their own. Julia Taft thus enjoyed a special place in their lives, and her memoir reveals the warmth she elicited from the couple. She speaks of her initial fear of Lincoln—the towering, rough-and-tumble backwoodsman—who won her over with teasing, and of her relationship with Mary, who was never really accepted into Washington social life and took particular comfort in Julia's presence.
 
A unique glimpse into the social life of the Lincoln White House, Julia Taft Bayne's memoir shows us the human drama played out daily behind the great pageant of history.

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Tahiti Beyond the Postcard

Power, Place, and Everyday Life (Culture, Place, and Nature)

Miriam Kahn is professor of anthropology at the University of Washington and author of Always Hungry, Never Greedy: Food and the Expression of Gender in a Melanesian Society.

Tahiti evokes visions of white beaches and beautiful women. This imagined paradise, created by Euro-American romanticism, endures today as the bedrock of Tahiti's tourism industry, while quite a different place is inhabited and experienced by ta'ata ma'ohi, as Tahitians refer to themselves. This book brings into dialogue the perspectives on place of both Tahitians and Europeans. Miriam Kahn is professor of anthropology at the University of Washington and author of Always Hungry, Never Greedy.

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Taifa

Making Nation and Race in Urban Tanzania

James R. Brennan

Taifa is a story of African intellectual agency, but it is also an account of how nation and race emerged out of the legal, social, and economic histories in one major city, Dar es Salaam. Nation and race—both translatable as taifa in Swahili—were not simply universal ideas brought to Africa by European colonizers, as previous studies assume. They were instead categories crafted by local African thinkers to make sense of deep inequalities, particularly those between local Africans and Indian immigrants. Taifa shows how nation and race became the key political categories to guide colonial and postcolonial life in this African city.

Using deeply researched archival and oral evidence, Taifa transforms our understanding of urban history and shows how concerns about access to credit and housing became intertwined with changing conceptions of nation and nationhood. Taifa gives equal attention to both Indians and Africans; in doing so, it demonstrates the significance of political and economic connections between coastal East Africa and India during the era of British colonialism, and illustrates how the project of racial nationalism largely severed these connections by the 1970s.

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Taiko Boom

Japanese Drumming in Place and Motion

Shawn Bender

With its thunderous sounds and dazzling choreography, Japanese taiko drumming has captivated audiences in Japan and across the world, making it one of the most successful performing arts to emerge from Japan in the past century. Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted among taiko groups in Japan, Taiko Boom explores the origins of taiko in the early postwar period and its popularization over the following decades of rapid economic growth in Japan’s cities and countryside. Building on the insights of globalization studies, the book argues that taiko developed within and has come to express new forms of communal association in a Japan increasingly engaged with global cultural flows. While its popularity has created new opportunities for Japanese to participate in community life, this study also reveals how the discourses and practices of taiko drummers dramatize tensions inherent in Japanese conceptions of race, the body, gender, authenticity, and locality.

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Tail of the Storm

Flying Missions in the First Gulf War

Within days of Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, the far reaching arm of American airpower sprang into action. The skyscapes of the North Atlantic, Europe, and the Mediterranean became laced with the contrails of great jets flowing day and night toward the Persian Gulf. From the skies, manpower and material poured onto the bleak sands under the ominous clouds of the gathering storm, and in only a few weeks the size of the effort eclipsed that of the Berlin Airlift.

The thousands of crewmembers flying the jets, as well as those servicing and managing them, became the backbone of history’s largest air logistical operation. Many of these men and women were Air Force reservists, and the author participated as a pilot of a C-141B Starlifter with the Mississippi Air National Guard.

Cockrell writes lyrically about flying and about the emotional and intellectual satisfaction enjoyed by those who fly. His focus is on the people recalled to active duty, who flew thousands of hours, coping with fatigue, cracked wings, missile attacks, and, in some cases, deteriorating businesses and families at home. Tail of the Storm gives expression to their love of flight, as well as their dedication to the endangered values of duty, honor, country. This story is good reading—not only for those who share the author’s enthusiasm for flying but also for those who read for pleasure and have a curiosity about a pilot’s world.

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The Tailors of Tomaszow

A Memoir of Polish Jews

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Tails from the Exotic Feline Rescue Center, 25th Anniversary Edition

Foreword by Bill Nimmo. Stephen D. McCloud and Joe Taft

Meet Sahib, Sampson, Zulu, Rouge, Blaze—just a few of the 200 big cats that await visitors at the Exotic Feline Rescue Center. The EFRC, in Center Point, Indiana, is a nationally recognized leader in big cat rescue, conservation, and care. Almost all of these cats—tigers, bobcats, lions, pumas, and servals—are survivors of abuse and neglect. In this follow-up to Saving the Big Cats and Real Stories of Big Cat Rescues, photographer Stephen D. McCloud showcases the newest residents of this lush 108-acre sanctuary, now celebrating its 25th anniversary. Readers will be fascinated by the stories of these incredible feline predators in this anniversary edition, which includes a foreword by Tigers of America founder Bill Nimmo.

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Tails on the Hill

Stories about a Family and Its Dogs

Carol Thornton

According to the old adage, a dog is man’s best friend. However, in small town West Texas, a dog is also young girl’s best friend. Told through the eyes of an adolescent female narrator, Carol Thornton’s Tails on the Hill depicts the happenings of the Hill Gang, an eclectic collection of dogs that wander in and out of her life. A refuge for all abandoned dogs, the narrator’s home shelters all types of personalities. Told in brief tales, each dog’s character seems more human and lovable than the next. Yet equally engaging and lovable are the glimpses the narrator offers of her family, especially her father. This is a book about love and loyalty.

There’s Pobre, the peace-loving pound dog, and Posse, the stubborn husky. Then there’s May-ree, the abandoned hunting dog, and Wookie, the German shepherd who always has a new litter of puppies. And who could forget Tootie and Katy, the schnauzers who cause such trouble in the pet parlor? With each tale, the reader is transported into the heartfelt experiences of a unique extended family that includes both people and dogs.

A narrative for any dog lover, Thornton’s Tails on the Hill explores the complex, devoted relationship between dog and owner and will warm the hearts of all readers with its sometimes light and sometimes poignant tales.

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Tainted Earth

Smelters, Public Health, and the Environment

by Marianne Sullivan

Smelting is an industrial process involving the extraction of metal from ore. During this process, impurities in ore—including arsenic, lead, and cadmium—may be released from smoke stacks, contaminating air, water, and soil with toxic-heavy metals.The problem of public health harm from smelter emissions received little official attention for much for the twentieth century. Though people living near smelters periodically complained that their health was impaired by both sulfur dioxide and heavy metals, for much of the century there was strong deference to industry claims that smelter operations were a nuisance and not a serious threat to health. It was only when the majority of children living near the El Paso, Texas, smelter were discovered to be lead-exposed in the early 1970s that systematic, independent investigation of exposure to heavy metals in smelting communities began. Following El Paso, an even more serious led poisoning epidemic was discovered around the Bunker Hill smelter in northern Idaho. In Tacoma, Washington, a copper smelter exposed children to arsenic—a carcinogenic threat.Thoroughly grounded in extensive archival research, Tainted Earth traces the rise of public health concerns about nonferrous smelting in the western United States, focusing on three major facilities: Tacoma, Washington; El Paso, Texas; and Bunker Hill, Idaho. Marianne Sullivan documents the response from community residents, public health scientists, the industry, and the government to pollution from smelters as well as the long road to protecting public health and the environment. Placing the environmental and public health aspects of smelting in historical context, the book connects local incidents to national stories on the regulation of airborne toxic metals.The nonferrous smelting industry has left a toxic legacy in the United States and around the world. Unless these toxic metals are cleaned up, they will persist in the environment and may sicken people—children in particular—for generations to come. The twentieth-century struggle to control smelter pollution shares many similarities with public health battles with such industries as tobacco and asbestos where industry supported science created doubt about harm, and reluctant government regulators did not take decisive action to protect the public’s health.

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