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Palestinian Music and Song Cover

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Palestinian Music and Song

Expression and Resistance since 1900

Edited by Moslih Kanaaneh, Stig-Magnus Thorsén, Heather Bursheh, and David A. McDonald

Drawing from a long history of indigenous traditions and incorporating diverse influences of surrounding cultures, music in Palestine and among the millions of Palestinians in diaspora offers a unique window on cultural and political events of the past century. From the perspective of scholars, performers, composers, and activists, Palestinian Music and Song examines the many ways in which music has been a force of representation, nation building, and social action. From the turn of the 20th century, when Palestine became an exotic object of fascination for missionaries and scholars, to 21st-century transnational collaborations in hip hop and new media, this volume traces the conflicting dynamics of history and tradition, innovation and change, power and resistance.

Palestinian Politics after Arafat Cover

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Palestinian Politics after Arafat

A Failed National Movement

As'ad Ghanem

The Palestinian national movement reached a dead-end and came close to disintegration at the beginning of the present century. The struggle for power after the death of Yasser Arafat in 2004 signaled the end of a path toward statehood prepared by the Oslo Accords a decade before. The reasons for the failure of the movement are deeply rooted in modern Palestinian history. As'ad Ghanem analyzes the internal and external events that unfolded as the Palestinian national movement became a "failed national movement," marked by internecine struggle and collapse, the failure to secure establishment of a separate state and achieve a stable peace with Israel, and the movement's declining stature within the Arab world and the international community.

Palestinian Women and Politics in Israel Cover

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Palestinian Women and Politics in Israel

Suheir Abu Oksa Daoud

Though equal rights protection is written into Israeli law, women are underrepresented in the political arena. This is especially true in the case of Palestinian women--only two in the entire sixty year history of Israel have been members of the Knesset.

Suheir Abu Oksa Daoud examines the various factors that have created this culture of political oppression. She relies on both feminist theory and theories of colonial domination as well as conclusions drawn from personal interviews with female activists. Utilizing Arabic, English, and Hebrew sources, she also makes careful distinctions between the lives and experiences of Christian, Muslim, Bedouin, and Druze women.

Daoud's focus remains squarely on the experiences of Palestinian women, however, and she demonstrates that the problem is not only due to the minority status of Palestinians. She reveals how they are further hampered by Arab cultural attitudes toward women and the overall political culture in Israel, which continues to privilege men over women even as it pays lip service to equality.

Palestinian-Arab Minority in Israel, 1948-2000, The Cover

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Palestinian-Arab Minority in Israel, 1948-2000, The

A Political Study

Examines the difficulties of Palestinian-Arab political life in Israel. 'As’ad Ghanem provides a comprehensive description of the political development of the Palestinian-Arab minority in Israel and also discusses their social, cultural, and economic experiences. Covering two main aspects of politics—the different manifestations of politics and the dilemmas created by these politics—he presents the predicament of the Palestinian-Arab minority in Israel, which derives from the ethnic character of the State of Israel and their isolation from other Palestinians, and proposes the Israeli-Palestinian bi-national state as a suitable resolution not only for this problem but also for the main Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Palestinians Born in Exile Cover

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Palestinians Born in Exile

Diaspora and the Search for a Homeland

By Juliane Hammer

In the decade following the 1993 Oslo Peace Accords, some 100,000 diasporic Palestinians returned to the West Bank and Gaza. Among them were children and young adults who were born in exile and whose sense of Palestinian identity was shaped not by lived experience but rather through the transmission and re-creation of memories, images, and history. As a result, “returning” to the homeland that had never actually been their home presented challenges and disappointments for these young Palestinians, who found their lifeways and values sometimes at odds with those of their new neighbors in the West Bank and Gaza. This original ethnography records the experiences of Palestinians born in exile who have emigrated to the Palestinian homeland. Juliane Hammer interviews young adults between the ages of 16 and 35 to learn how their Palestinian identity has been affected by living in various Arab countries or the United States and then moving to the West Bank and Gaza. Their responses underscore how much the experience of living outside of Palestine has become integral to the Palestinian national character, even as Palestinians maintain an overwhelming sense of belonging to one another as a people.

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Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International

Vol. 1 (2012) through current issue

Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes cutting-edge interdisciplinary scholarship and creative work by and about women of the African Diaspora and their communities in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds.

Palliative Care for Infants, Children, and Adolescents Cover

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Palliative Care for Infants, Children, and Adolescents

A Practical Handbook

edited by Brian S. Carter, M.D., Marcia Levetown, M.D., and Sarah E. Friebert, M.D.

There are few things requiring more expertise, delicacy, and compassion than caring for an infant, child, or young adult with a life-limiting condition. Written by leading researchers, clinicians from relevant disciplines, family members, and advocates, this practical guide provides professionals involved in pediatric palliative and end-of-life care with comprehensive information in a single volume. Thoroughly updated and expanded, this edition includes chapters addressing the unique challenges facing children with HIV / AIDS and their families, care in home and ICU settings, difficult decision-making processes, and the importance of communication with the child and family as well as completely new chapters on spiritual dimensions of care and educational and advocacy initiatives. Intended for primary care physicians, pediatric practitioners and specialists, home care and hospice personnel, pastoral counselors, and affected families, the book includes useful resource and reference material and practical, hands-on tips. With contributions from an international group of expert educators, clinicians, and parents, this book takes a truly interdisciplinary approach to pediatric palliative care, presenting best practices, clear instruction, and the latest information and research for anyone involved in pediatric palliative and end-of-life care. Praise for the first edition "An inspiring and accessible look at what end-of-life care for children should be—it is a text that should grace the shelf of every clinician facing the death of young patients."—Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry "A great resource and learning tool . . . well written, well organized, very practical, and user friendly as a reference for all disciplines involved with palliative care."—American Academy of Pediatrics Newsletter "This book is rich with palliative care experts’ knowledge as well as humbling experiences of children and their families undergoing the latest stages of a life-threatening illness, the dying process, the death, and finally bereavement. Every chapter is written with a high degree of expertise and the authors’ compassion is ever present."—Journal of Palliative Medicine

The Palm Oil Controversy in Southeast Asia Cover

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The Palm Oil Controversy in Southeast Asia

A Transnational Perspective

The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home Cover

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The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home

Jim Harrison

With its fanlike evergreen fronds, soft trunk, and strong root system, the palmetto is a wind-adapted palm that can bend with strong sea breezes without breaking or being uprooted. Emblematic of survival against opposition, the palmetto tree has captured the imaginations of South Carolinians for generations, appearing on the state seal since the American Revolution and on the state flag since 1861. The palmetto was named South Carolina's official state tree by Governor Burnet R. Maybank in 1939, and in 1974 Governor John C. West commissioned acclaimed South Carolina artist Jim Harrison to paint the official palmetto tree portrait for the State of South Carolina, an image that adorns the State House to this day. The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home showcases the timeless, natural beauty of the state tree in marshland and coastal landscapes in the popular Harrison style. Appearing on glassware, stationery, jewelry, and many other decorative and functional objects, the palmetto tree is an omnipresent symbol in South Carolina culture. For Harrison the palmetto remains foremost an icon of the wondrous Carolina coastal habitats. Sweeping images of the coast have been part of Harrison's art since the beginning of his career, and he continues to illustrate his love of the South Carolina coast by capturing the beauty of the state tree amid the many stunning and enchanting scenes included here. The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home also explores the historical background of the tree and its many ties to South Carolina's heritage as a symbol of strength and beauty worthy of this artistic celebration.

A Palmetto Boy Cover

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A Palmetto Boy

Civil War-Era Diaries and Letters of James Adams Tillman

Bobbie Swearingen Smith

The Tillman family of Edgefield, South Carolina, is forever linked to Palmetto State history, but not all of its members have yet had their stories told. James Adams Tillman (1842–1866) never had the chance to become a governor or U.S. senator like his younger brother "Pitchfork" Ben or a U.S. congressman like his older brother George. But, like his more famous siblings, James also dedicated his life to the service of his community and state—a dedication that led to his death at the young age of twenty-four from injuries sustained during the Civil War. Overshadowed in the annals of history by his brothers, James has largely been unrecognized until now. Edited by Bobbie Swearingen Smith, these collected diary entries and family letters offer a significant historical record of the Civil War era as experienced by a steadfast representative of this prominent South Carolina family and offer meaningful insights into James's brief life and ultimate sacrifice. At nineteen James Tillman had completed secondary school and had intentions to pursue a teaching career when the outbreak of the Civil War changed his priorities. Tillman enlisted with the Twenty-fourth South Carolina Volunteer Infantry of Edgefield and attained the rank of captain during the war. He was initially stationed along the coastal defenses south of Charleston and fought in both battles of Secessionville in 1862. He was wounded at Chickamauga in 1863, and his mother and brother Ben brought him home to recover. Tillman returned to duty and spent much of 1864 under the command of General Joseph E. Johnston in Tennessee and North Carolina, retreating from General Sherman's advance. At the war's end, Tillman returned home crestfallen and witnessed the rough onset of Reconstruction, writing in his diaries about those he saw as descending on South Carolina to profit from the defeated South. In June 1866, a little more than a year after his discharge, he died of complications from his combat wounds. Through the combination of Tillman's diaries and letters, the modern reader is invited to share in both the immediacy of his thoughts from the war front and his contemplative expressions of those experiences for his home-front audience of family members. Tillman's personal narrative adds another layer to our understanding of the historical significance of the Tillman family and offers a compelling firsthand account of the motivations and actions of a young South Carolinian at war as he struggled to find sense in the midst of unfathomable chaos.

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