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Macau

A Cultural Janus

Christina Miu Bing Cheng

By concentrating on the ambivalent history of Macau, the author reveals the historical reality of cultural vacillation between two political entities and the emergence of a creole minority - the Macanese.

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Macau Casino Complex

A stunning visual representation of the urban transformation of China’s Macau into the world’s largest gambling center.

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Macedonian

A Course for Beginning and Intermediate Students

Christina E. Kramer

Macedonian, the official language of the Republic of Macedonia, is spoken by two and a half million people in the Balkans, North America, Australia, and other émigré communities around the world. Christina E. Kramer’s award-winning textbook provides a basic introduction to the language. Students will learn to speak, read, write, and understand Macedonian while discussing family, work, recreation, music, food, health, housing, travel, and other topics.
    Intended to cover one year of intensive study, this third edition updates the vocabulary, adds material to help students appreciate the underlying structure of the language, and offers a wide variety of new, proficiency-based readings and exercises to boost knowledge of Macedonian history, culture, literature, folklore, and traditions.

Winner, Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy, American Association of Teachers of Slavic and Eastern European Languages

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Machado de Assis, the Brazilian Pyrrhonian

by José Raimundo Maia Neto

Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is Brazil's greatest writer and the most important Latin American writer of the nineteenth century. His subtle criticism of cherished institutions is evident to all readers, and critics have often mentioned his skepticism. In Machado de Assis, the Brazilian Pyrrhonian, however, a philosopher seriously examines Machado's philosophical position for the first time. Jose' Raimundo Maia Neto traces Machado's particular brand of skepticism to that of the ancient philosopher Pyrrho of Elis and reveals the sources through which he inherited that line of thought. He then shows how Machado's own philosophical development follows the stages proposed by Pyrrho for the development of a skeptical worldview.

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Machado de Assis

Toward a Poetics of Emulation

João Cezar de Castro Rocha, translated by Flora Thomson-DeVeaux This book offers an alternative explanation for one of the core dilemmas of Brazilian literary criticism: the “midlife crisis” Machado de Assis underwent from 1878 to 1880, the result of which was the writing of The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas, as well as the remarkable production of his mature years—with an emphasis on his masterpiece, Dom Casmurro.

At the center of this alternative explanation, Castro Rocha situates the fallout from the success enjoyed by Eça de Queirós with the publication of Cousin Basílio and Machado’s two long texts condemning the author and his work. Literary and aesthetic rivalries come to the fore, allowing for a new theoretical framework based on a literary appropriation of “thick description,” the method proposed by anthropologist Clifford Geertz. From this method, Castro Rocha derives his key hypothesis: an unforeseen consequence of Machado’s reaction to Eça’s novel was a return to the classical notion of aemulatio, which led Machado to develop a “poetics of emulation.”

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Machaut's Legacy

The Judgment Poetry Tradition in the Later Middle Ages and Beyond

R. Barton Palmer

"Machaut's Legacy deepens our appreciation of the poet's wide-ranging accomplishments and influences, which span from the Middle Ages to the postmodern era. It stakes out exciting new territories and provocative theses, all of which enhance our understanding of this genius of world literature."--Tison Pugh, author of Chaucer's (Anti-)Eroticisms and the Queer Middle Ages "This richly erudite volume contextualizes Machaut as a seminal medieval poet whose work extends its reach well into the modern era. Machaut's Legacy pulls the reader through almost 700 years of literary history, illustrating the extraordinary influence that this writer had on his contemporaries, as well as his lasting impact on the modern novel."--Lynn T. Ramey, author of Black Legacies: Race and the European Middle Ages "Truly brilliant. Makes a claim to a paradigm shift in how we envisage the history of literature. Palmer and Kimmelman make an excellent case for Machaut as the major innovator in narrative and that his genre, the dit, heralds modernism or even postmodernism."--William Calin, author of The Lily and the Thistle: The French Tradition and the Older Literature of Scotland "An ambitious work that seeks, with great acuity, the origin of the kind of 'novel' in the dit and not in the romaunt. It examines the development of the judgment poetry format through the study of three texts by Machaut, pondering on this intricate form."--Jacqueline Cerquiglini-Toulet, author of A New History of Medieval French Literature A daring rewrite of literary history, contributors to this volume argue that the medieval poet, composer, and musician Guillaume de Machaut was the major influence in narrative craft during the late Middle Ages and long after. Examining Machaut's series of debate poems, part of the French tradition of dit amoureux (love tales), contributors highlight the genre's authorial self-consciousness, polyvocality, and ambiguity of judgment. They contend that Machaut led the way in developing and spreading these radical techniques and that his innovations in form and content were forerunners of the modern novel. R. Barton Palmer, Calhoun Lemon Professor of Literature and director of film studies at Clemson University, is coeditor of An Anthology of Medieval Love Debate Poetry. Burt Kimmelman, professor of English at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, is the author of The Poetics of Authorship in the Later Middle Ages: The Emergence of the Modern Literary Persona.

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Machiavelli in Love

Sex, Self, and Society in the Italian Renaissance

Guido Ruggiero

Machiavelli in Love introduces a complex concept of sex and sexual identity and their roles in the culture and politics of the Italian Renaissance. Guido Ruggiero's study counters the consensus among historians and literary critics that there was little sense of individual identity and almost no sense of sexual identity before the modern period. Drawing from the works of major literary figures such as Boccaccio, Aretino, and Castiglione, and rereading them against archival evidence, Ruggiero examines the concept of identity via consensus realities of family, neighbors, friends, and social peers, as well as broader communities and solidarities. The author contends that Renaissance Italians understood sexual identity as a part of the human life cycle, something that changed throughout stages of youthful experimentation, marriage, adult companionship, and old age. Machiavelli’s letters and literary production reveal a fascinating construction of self that is highly reliant on sexual reputation. Ruggiero's challenging reinterpretation of this canonical figure, as well as his unique treatment of other major works of the period, offer new approaches for reading Renaissance literature and new understandings of the way life was lived and perceived during this time.

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Machiavelli's Ethics

Erica Benner

Machiavelli's Ethics challenges the most entrenched understandings of Machiavelli, arguing that he was a moral and political philosopher who consistently favored the rule of law over that of men, that he had a coherent theory of justice, and that he did not defend the "Machiavellian" maxim that the ends justify the means. By carefully reconstructing the principled foundations of his political theory, Erica Benner gives the most complete account yet of Machiavelli's thought. She argues that his difficult and puzzling style of writing owes far more to ancient Greek sources than is usually recognized, as does his chief aim: to teach readers not how to produce deceptive political appearances and rhetoric, but how to see through them. Drawing on a close reading of Greek authors--including Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, and Plutarch--Benner identifies a powerful and neglected key to understanding Machiavelli.

This important new interpretation is based on the most comprehensive study of Machiavelli's writings to date, including a detailed examination of all of his major works: The Prince, The Discourses, The Art of War, and Florentine Histories. It helps explain why readers such as Bacon and Rousseau could see Machiavelli as a fellow moral philosopher, and how they could view The Prince as an ethical and republican text. By identifying a rigorous structure of principles behind Machiavelli's historical examples, the book should also open up fresh debates about his relationship to later philosophers, including Rousseau, Hobbes, and Kant.

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